Đề Xuất 2/2023 # Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” # Top 9 Like | Beiqthatgioi.com

Đề Xuất 2/2023 # Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good” # Top 9 Like

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Are you tired of always saying “good”?

Maybe you’d like to try some new English vocabulary words instead?

Using new vocabulary might not make you more popular or happier…

…But it probably will make you smarter, and also improve your ability to communicate—which can lead to many other good things!

The English vocabulary word list below shows 10 great alternatives to the word “good.”

If you’re an ESL student who wants to improve their English vocabulary, this post is for you.

If you are an ESL teacher looking for ESL vocabulary word lists, this is especially for you.

This isn’t just a list of synonyms.

After reading the descriptions and examples we have below, you’ll be able to move beyond just describing everything as “good.”

Looking forward to using more vivid and creative ways to describe people, places and experiences that you enjoy?

Let’s get started!

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere.

Improve Your English Vocabulary: 10 Great Alternatives to “Good”

Before we get this awesome party started, let me tell you about a cool place where you can find all these words and more: FluentU.

FluentU takes real-world videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

With FluentU you’ll be able to learn every word in context. Your vocabulary will jump through the roof in no time! Give it a try for free and see for yourself.

And now, back to our words!

Cool

In addition to being used to describe temperature, “cool” also means very good or fashionable. For example, you might describe stylish clothes as “cool” or a performance by a musician that you really enjoy.

It can also be used to express acceptance when someone makes a suggestion. For example, if someone suggests meeting to go to a movie, you could say “Cool! I’ll see you at 6 p.m.” Like “awesome,” “cool” is a popular expression for younger people, and you shouldn’t use it in more formal conversations.

Excellent

“Excellent” is used to describe something very good or of high quality. Almost anything you can describe as “good,” you can also describe as excellent. It can be used when speaking to friends, family, or coworkers when you want to emphasize that something is not just ok or good, but very good.

If someone asks “how are you,” you can respond “excellent.” Or, similar to this restaurant review, you could say “Have you been to the new restaurant downtown? The food there is excellent.”

Wonderful

“Wonderful” means great or very good. People can be wonderful, experiences can be wonderful and things can be wonderful. You can use this word in both formal and casual settings.

For example, you could say “The paintings at the art exhibition last night were wonderful,” or “I think you’ll like her. She’s a wonderful person.”

Perfect

Perfect describes something that is flawless or exactly matching the need in a particular situation.

If you have a very good day and everything happens exactly as you want it to, you could describe it as a “perfect day.” A hotel could be “perfect for families” or an actor in a movie could be “perfect for the role.” If someone suggests an idea that you like, you can say “That’s perfect” or “That sounds perfect.”

Fantastic

The word “fantastic” is used to describe something very good or exciting. It can be used in both formal and informal situations. It’s a very enthusiastic, positive word, so you should say it with some emphasis or exclamation.

For example, if someone asks you about your trip to Thailand, you could say “It was fantastic!”

Exceptional

“Exceptional” means that someone or something is above average. This adjective has a slightly more formal tone, and it’s a good word to use when you want to sound a little more sophisticated.

For example, you could say “I think Italy is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. The scenery is exceptional.”

Terrific

“Terrific” means very good or great. You can use it the same way you use “good.” It’s another very enthusiastic adjective, so only use it if you’re describing something you really like a lot.

You could describe someone’s idea or performance as “terrific,” such as “I’m very happy with the results. She did a terrific job on this project.”

Keep in mind that “terrific” can also be used to describe something very bad depending on the noun it’s paired with. For example, you could also talk about a “terrific storm” or a “terrific explosion.”

Outstanding

“Outstanding” describes something that “stands out” or is noticeably better than the alternatives. An “outstanding” book is better than all the other books you’ve read recently, or an “outstanding” hotel is one of the nicest hotels you’ve ever stayed in. This adjective is appropriate to use in casual or formal conversations.

Note that “outstanding” can also mean “unpaid” depending on the situation. So if you have an “outstanding” bill, it means that you have a bill that needs to be paid, not a “very good” bill.

Pleasant

“Pleasant” describes something that is enjoyable or likable. It can be used to describe people, places, or experiences. “Pleasant” is a little less strong than words like “outstanding,” “terrific” or “fantastic” and it can be a good word to use if something was nice, yet not the absolute best thing imaginable.

For example, you could say “We had a nice time at dinner. It was a very pleasant evening.”

Awesome

Technically, “awesome” describes something that inspires awe or wonder. Typically, however, “awesome” is used to describe people, experiences or places that are very good or impressive.

For example, you could say “I love your new watch. It looks awesome.” It’s an adjective that is particularly popular with younger people, and it’s not an expression that you would want to use in a formal or business situation.

Say goodbye to “good!” Now you have some awesome, terrific, wonderful synonyms to improve your English vocabulary way beyond the basics.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere.

If you liked this post, something tells me that you’ll love FluentU, the best way to learn English with real-world videos.

Experience English immersion online!

Improve Your English Vocabulary With 10 Great Alternatives To “Good”

Are you tired of always saying “good”?

Maybe you’d like to try some new English vocabulary words instead?

Using new vocabulary might not make you more popular or happier…

…But it probably will make you smarter, and also improve your ability to communicate-which can lead to many other good things!

The English vocabulary word list below shows 10 great alternatives to the word “good.”

If you’re an ESL student who wants to improve their English vocabulary, this post is for you.

If you are an ESL teacher looking for ESL vocabulary word lists, this is especially for you.

This isn’t just a list of synonyms.

After reading the descriptions and examples we have below, you’ll be able to move beyond just describing everything as “good.”

Looking forward to using more vivid and creative ways to describe people, places and experiences that you enjoy?

Let’s get started!

Before we get this awesome party started, let me tell you about a cool place where you can find all these words and more: FluentU.

FluentU takes real-world videos-like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks-and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

With FluentU you’ll be able to learn every word in context. Your vocabulary will jump through the roof in no time! Give it a try for free and see for yourself.

And now, back to our words!

Cool

In addition to being used to describe temperature, “cool” also means very good or fashionable. For example, you might describe stylish clothes as “cool” or a performance by a musician that you really enjoy.

It can also be used to express acceptance when someone makes a suggestion. For example, if someone suggests meeting to go to a movie, you could say “Cool! I’ll see you at 6 p.m.” Like “awesome,” “cool” is a popular expression for younger people, and you shouldn’t use it in more formal conversations.

Excellent

“Excellent” is used to describe something very good or of high quality. Almost anything you can describe as “good,” you can also describe as excellent. It can be used when speaking to friends, family, or coworkers when you want to emphasize that something is not just ok or good, but very good.

If someone asks “how are you,” you can respond “excellent.” Or, similar to this restaurant review, you could say “Have you been to the new restaurant downtown? The food there is excellent.”

Wonderful

“Wonderful” means great or very good. People can be wonderful, experiences can be wonderful and things can be wonderful. You can use this word in both formal and casual settings.

For example, you could say “The paintings at the art exhibition last night were wonderful,” or “I think you’ll like her. She’s a wonderful person.”

Perfect

Perfect describes something that is flawless or exactly matching the need in a particular situation.

If you have a very good day and everything happens exactly as you want it to, you could describe it as a “perfect day.” A hotel could be “perfect for families” or an actor in a movie could be “perfect for the role.” If someone suggests an idea that you like, you can say “That’s perfect” or “That sounds perfect.”

Fantastic

The word “fantastic” is used to describe something very good or exciting. It can be used in both formal and informal situations. It’s a very enthusiastic, positive word, so you should say it with some emphasis or exclamation.

For example, if someone asks you about your trip to Thailand, you could say “It was fantastic!”

Exceptional

“Exceptional” means that someone or something is above average. This adjective has a slightly more formal tone, and it’s a good word to use when you want to sound a little more sophisticated.

For example, you could say “I think Italy is one of the most beautiful countries in the world. The scenery is exceptional.”

Terrific

“Terrific” means very good or great. You can use it the same way you use “good.” It’s another very enthusiastic adjective, so only use it if you’re describing something you really like a lot.

You could describe someone’s idea or performance as “terrific,” such as “I’m very happy with the results. She did a terrific job on this project.”

Keep in mind that “terrific” can also be used to describe something very bad depending on the noun it’s paired with. For example, you could also talk about a “terrific storm” or a “terrific explosion.”

Outstanding

“Outstanding” describes something that “stands out” or is noticeably better than the alternatives. An “outstanding” book is better than all the other books you’ve read recently, or an “outstanding” hotel is one of the nicest hotels you’ve ever stayed in. This adjective is appropriate to use in casual or formal conversations.

Note that “outstanding” can also mean “unpaid” depending on the situation. So if you have an “outstanding” bill, it means that you have a bill that needs to be paid, not a “very good” bill.

Pleasant

“Pleasant” describes something that is enjoyable or likable. It can be used to describe people, places, or experiences. “Pleasant” is a little less strong than words like “outstanding,” “terrific” or “fantastic” and it can be a good word to use if something was nice, yet not the absolute best thing imaginable.

For example, you could say “We had a nice time at dinner. It was a very pleasant evening.”

Awesome

Technically, “awesome” describes something that inspires awe or wonder. Typically, however, “awesome” is used to describe people, experiences or places that are very good or impressive.

For example, you could say “I love your new watch. It looks awesome.” It’s an adjective that is particularly popular with younger people, and it’s not an expression that you would want to use in a formal or business situation.

Say goodbye to “good!” Now you have some awesome, terrific, wonderful synonyms to improve your English vocabulary way beyond the basics.

And One More Thing…

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials, as you can see here:

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

For example, when you tap on the word “searching,” you see this:

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words-and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using FluentU on the website with your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or from the Google Play store.

If you liked this post, something tells me that you’ll love FluentU, the best way to learn English with real-world videos.

Experience English immersion online!

10 Beautiful Japanese Words To Add To Your Vocabulary List

A deep love for books that dips into the philosophical.

Daydreams and nostalgia.

Words have the power to evoke all those feelings.

And in Japanese, there are words for all the fleeting feelings we described above-and more.

If you’re learning Japanese, you probably don’t need to be told that it’s a beautiful language. You already know.

Instead, we’d like to introduce you to a collection of beautiful Japanese words that we love, and you’re sure to enjoy too.

But first, what exactly makes a word “beautiful”?

What Makes a Japanese Word Beautiful?

What makes one word more beautiful than another? Here are a few factors that turn a Japanese word from a tool for communication into a work of art:

The way it rolls off the tongue.

English has its own set of words that are just pleasant to say. Nefarious. Equinox. Supine. Something about certain words can make one feel tingly right down to the bone.

Some Japanese words have a similar effect, even if you’re not a native speaker.

Aesthetically pleasing kana.

Japanese kanji, hiragana and katakana are incredibly beautiful alphabets to read and write. But some kana for particular words are especially beautiful-almost like an elegant drawing.

A unique and beautiful meaning not commonly found in the English language.

English can sometimes be a pretty limiting language. For example, our word for “love” is pretty much just “love.” In Hebrew, though, there are many other words for different types of love, such as lustful love, love of God, platonic love, etc.

Similarly, Japanese has words for things that you’ll never find in the English language, which is pretty fascinating and beautiful in itself!

Add these beautiful words to your vocabulary, use them in everyday conversation or simply keep them close to your heart as a reminder of the beauty of the Japanese language.

Better yet, add them to a literal vocabulary list on FluentU.

Definition: A word that sounds sweet and pleasant to the ear.

Ironically, our first beautiful Japanese word on this list can be used to describe beautiful Japanese words.

This expression is often used when someone says a word that’s audibly beautiful, but sometimes couples will use it when one of them compliments the other.

Example sentences:

Person 1: 私の名前は日光です。(わたし の なまえ は にっこう です。) Person 1: My name is Sunshine.

Definition: The act of buying too many books and never reading them.

Many of us are guilty of this bad habit, but unfortunately, there’s no word for it in the English language.

While the meaning of this Japanese word is pretty unique, its sound is also beautiful: It rolls off the tongue and is just very pleasant to say out loud. Try it!

Example sentence:

Definition: A cold fragrant wind that arrives shortly before wintertime.

In most places around the world, autumn is chilly. However, towards the end of October or even early November in Japan, there’s a cold, brisk and bitter wind that signals the beginning of colder weather.

If you’re outside at just the right moment to feel it, you’ll know that winter is on the way. This Japanese word beautifully represents the end of a season. Although this kind of wind occurs in many parts of the United States, there’s no word for it in English.

Example sentence:

Definition: A mother who always relentlessly forces to her child towards academic achievement.

Maybe this isn’t the most beautiful word in the Japanese language, but it’s certainly a unique-and culturally relevant-term.

Depending on who you talk to, 教育ママ could be a very endearing and comedic term or a downright disastrous one.

In English, this word roughly translates to “educational mother.” This is typically an overbearing, obsessively supportive mother in Japan. An expression that’s close in meaning is “helicopter parent,” though the connotation is a bit different.

These moms are often stereotyped as air-headed but endearing women who tend to embarrass their kids by always bringing them to school, attending teacher conferences religiously, poking into parties to serve snacks, etc.

This term can also be an insult, as some of these mothers aren’t very well-meaning but rather are attempting to achieve financial and academic success vicariously through their children. Through the last decade, sometimes the 教育ママ are blamed for social phobias in young people.

Example sentence:

Definition: “I will always protect you.”

This term is typically said by a romantic partner to their beloved.

You wouldn’t throw this out to just anybody. Reserve it for a tender moment between yourself and someone you’ve been dating for a while.

Example sentence:

Definition: A wise and beautiful phrase that means “It just can’t be helped.”

When life gets rough and we blame ourselves for how things have ended up, remember this very smart and very true phrase often used by Japanese people.

The phrase describes the unpredictability of life and lack of control human beings really have in the grand scheme of things. People die, we lose friends, breakups happen, jobs are lost, economies crumble.

Remember that sometimes, things just can’t be helped.

Example sentences:

Person 1: 最近、彼は失業したんだよ。(さいきん、かれ は しつぎょう したんだ よ。) Person 1: He lost his job recently.

Person 2: しょうがないよ。 Person 2: It can’t be helped.

Definition: To daydream longingly.

When someone’s staring out a window, paying no attention to the world, lost in their own thoughts-that’s ぼけっと.

It can be an endearing term or an annoying one, especially when a student isn’t paying attention to their teacher.

Example sentence:

ぼけっとしないで! Quit your daydreaming!

Definition: This essentially means “nostalgia,” but particularly nostalgia that occurs when something triggers memories from a specific season.

The term roughly translates to “seasonal tradition.” If the smell or sight of something reminds you of a particular season, it’s a 風物詩 moment.

Example sentence:

Definition: The smell of rain before it begins to fall.

It’s worth noting that this is actually a borrowed word from English. “Petrichor” is the English word for the smell of rain and this Japanese word is a katakana borrowed from it.

Still, in either language, it’s a beautiful and pleasant thing you’ve probably experienced (unless you’re one of the 10% who can’t smell it -in which case, we’re so sorry!).

Example sentences:

Person 1: いい香り だ。(いい かおり だ。) Person 1: What a lovely aroma.

Definition: Ineffable, impossible. It can also mean “too grand or powerful to describe in words.”

This term is usually used for something that’s totally impossible and unfeasible.

It can also be used to describe the grandness and indescribable nature of space, Earth, the heavens or anything that human beings can’t really grasp.

Example sentence:

Are you entranced by these beautiful Japanese words? Remember, the more words you know, the closer to fluent you’ll become!

Emily Casalena is a published author, freelance writer and music columnist. She writes about a lot of stuff, from music to films to language.

Find Out How Strong Your Vocabulary Is And Learn New Words At Vocabulary.com.

Look up a word, learn it forever.

Don’t just memorize. Achieve mastery.

Ditch the flash cards and stop memorizing definitions. chúng tôi teaches you words by systematically exposing you to a wide array of question types and activities that will help you understand all the meanings and nuances of every word you’re learning.

Even after you’ve achieved mastery, we’ll continue to reinforce what you have learned to make sure that it all stays fresh in your memory.

Get the lowdown on every word.

Look up a word in our dictionary – you’ll read a friendly explanation that you’ll actually remember. It’s as if your favorite teacher were explaining the word to you.

Clever usage tips and real-world examples show you how words live in the wild so you’ll be more confident using them yourself.

Start playing.

We’ll get to know you.

As you play chúng tôi we figure out which words you know and which ones you need a little help with. We keep practicing with you until you master the tough ones.

Let us know which words you want to focus on, and we’ll prioritize those.

As your vocabulary grows, chúng tôi grows with you.

Who loves Vocabulary.com?

Students.

Whether you’re studying to ace tomorrow’s quiz, prepping for the SAT, or looking to speak and write more eloquently, chúng tôi can help.

I took the PSAT on Wednesday and the vocabulary section was a breeze. Keep doing what you do, your website has helped me so much!High School Student, Lewistown, PA

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Give your students the ability to attack the texts they encounter in the classroom, and the gift of a vocabulary that will open doors for a lifetime. Learn more.

Everyone.

You don’t have to be in school to use chúng tôi Millions of people play, learn new words, and compete on our leaderboards just for fun.

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We hope you love chúng tôi too. Sign up, it’s free.

It’s a science.

Vocabulary.com may seem simple on the outside, but behind the scenes we’re using sophisticated algorithms to help you learn over 15,000 words more effectively.

How? We start with our massive pool of over 225,000 questions. Then, we use the science of learning to model how you learn (and forget) new words.

By comparing your answers to the hundreds of millions of answers given by other chúng tôi users, we personalize your learning experience and choose the best question for you at just the right time.

It’s a game.

Sure, there’s a lot of science and technology muscle behind our system, but expanding your vocabulary doesn’t have to be a brain-buster.

We’ve turned learning vocabulary into an addictive game. Accumulate points, achievements, and badges while competing against your friends, your classmates, or other members of the chúng tôi community. You may not even notice that you’re learning along the way.

Learn the words you’ll need to know.

You choose…

Studying for an exam like the SAT, GRE, or TOEFL? We have over 50,000 ready-to-learn vocabulary lists – everything from standardized tests to classic literature, breaking news – you name it.

Just want to ace tomorrow’s vocabulary quiz? Create your own list of words to study. Vocabulary lists are easy to make, share, and learn.

Or, let us choose…

Don’t have a specific list in mind? Let our adaptive learning system find the right words for you.

Play a few questions and we’ll zero in on key academic words that are appropriate for your level. Once we get to know you, we won’t waste your time on words that are too easy or too hard.

Either way, you’ll improve.

Like a good coach, chúng tôi won’t give up on you. Whether you pick the words or let us find them for you, we’ll work with you until you’ve mastered them.

And even after you’ve achieved mastery, we’ll continue to reinforce what you have learned to make sure that it all stays fresh in your memory.

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With chúng tôi your students independently learn the words they need to know for deeper reading, clearer writing, and sharper thinking. Your Teacher Dashboard provides you with the helpful insights you need to target your instruction toward the concepts that need more teaching, and the students who need more support.

40+ French Transition Words To Boost Your Vocabulary

This is a handy term that you’re bound to use in everyday conversation. It means because and it can be used to respond to questions or transition between phrases.

Quand is an additional word that works well at the beginning of sentences. It means when. This word can also be combined with other words for a slightly more complex definition. For example, quand meme means even so, and n’importe quand (literally meaning it’s not important when) means whenever.

Je soutiens donc que

Considérons

Pour commencer

Not to be confused with enfin, en fait is easy to remember because it has quite a literal translation in English. En means in and fait means fact. En fait = In fact. Easy, right?

Au contraire

D’un part / d’autre part

Ainsi que means as well as and it can be used in two different contexts. For the first usage, use it to transition between two items that you’re ordering at a restaurant. Je voudrais le salad ainsi que le viande. (I would like the salad as well as the meat). Ainsi que can also mean just as or as well, like when you’re saying the film was just as sad as I thought it’d be.

Autrement dit

This phrase means first of all and it works well when recounting a story or giving directions or instructions. When writing, it’s also helpful when starting a sentence.

This fun and subjunctive-friendly phrase will certainly take your French to the next level. It means no matter what and is helpful for starting a well-intentioned belief.

Tant que falls into the same realm as quoi que, meaning as long as. Don’t forget to add the que onto this phrase, because tant by itself is used to express a general quantity, like many.

D’aprés moi

Je suis contre

De toute façon

Sooner or later, you’ll find yourself in a conversation where you’ll want to change the subject. Keep this transition short and light with de toute façon, which means anyway… and provides space for a new topic.

Boosting Your Vocabulary with French Transition Words

Learning to speak and write French is a challenging endeavor with long lasting benefits. Amp up your knowledge and become an impressive smooth talker by keeping these French transition words in your back pocket.

Want to learn how to use these transition words in context? Check out Clozemaster – thousands of sentences to help you learn French faster.

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