Đề Xuất 1/2023 # The Top Power Words And Buzzwords To Use In Your Resume # Top 6 Like | Beiqthatgioi.com

Đề Xuất 1/2023 # The Top Power Words And Buzzwords To Use In Your Resume # Top 6 Like

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It’s important to use power words in your resume and cover letters when applying for jobs. Using these words helps demonstrate your strengths and highlights why you are right for the job. Power words also jazz up your job descriptions and make them seem alive, as opposed to flat. 

Let’s begin by looking at the types of power words, why they are important, and how to effectively use them.

What Power Words Accomplish

Power words are used for several reasons. First, many hiring managers quickly skim through resumes and cover letters due to the high volume they receive. These power words jump off the page, quickly showing the hiring manager you have the skills and qualifications to get the job done.

Also, most resume language is repetitive and boring. If your language is the same as everyone else’s, it will be hard for you to stand out.

Thoughtful, appropriate word choice will set you apart from the competition.

Finally, power words (especially keywords) are useful when a company uses an Applicant Tracking System (ATS). These tracking systems help screen applications so that employers only need to focus on the top candidates. One way an ATS works is to eliminate resumes that are missing certain keywords.

By including these words, you increase your chances of making it through the ATS and having your application read.

Types of Power Words

The Balance / Melissa Ling

Action verbs: One type of power word is an action verb. This kind of verb shows your ability to succeed. These words demonstrate the skills you have used in previous jobs to achieve success.

Examples of action verbs include “accomplished,” “designed,” ”initiated,” and “supervised.”

Company values: To demonstrate that you are a good fit for the company, use key terms that the company uses to describe itself. You might find this language on the company’s “About Us” web page, or in the job listing. For example, if the company identifies itself as “innovative,” one power word you might incorporate into your resume is “innovate” or “innovative.” 

Popular skill words: There are certain skills and qualities that almost every employer is looking for in a job candidate. For example, employers always want an employee who is responsible, passionate, and a strong leader. Try to use this kind of language to demonstrate you have these essential skills.

Keywords: Keywords are words from the job listing that relate to particular skills or other requirements for the job. By embedding them in your resume or cover letter, you will demonstrate, at a glance, that you fit the requirements of the position. Keywords might be “analyzed,” “quantified,” “planned,” “programmed,” “designed,” “taught,” or “trained.”

Industry buzzwords and jargon: Each industry has certain keywords that are important. Knowing and accurately using those words demonstrates you have the necessary hard skills.

Resume buzzwords: You can decode the buzzwords that employers use in job postings, and use them to highlight your relevant skills in your resume.

Sprinkle the appropriate buzzwords into your resume and cover letter to demonstrate that you are a part of the industry. Some common buzzwords are experienced,” “expert,” “skilled,” “facilitated,” “launched,” and “demonstrated.”

How to Use Power Words

You can include power words throughout your resume, including in your job descriptions, resume summary statement, and your cover letter. 

Finally, it’s very important that you only use terms you are familiar with.

Power Words for Resumes and Cover Letters

A–D

Absorb

Accelerate

Access

Accomplish

Accrue

Acquire

Achieve

Act

Activate

Adapt

Address

Adjust

Administer

Advertise

Advise

Advocate

Affirm

Aid

Alert

Align

Allocate

Analyze

Apply

Appraise

Approve

Arbitrate

Arranged

Assemble

Assess

Assign

Assist

Attain

Authorize

Award

Begin

Brief

Bring

Broadcast

Budget

Build

Business

Calculate

Campaign

Certify

Chaired

Change

Chart

Check

Choose

Clarify

Classify

Coach

Collaborate

Collate

Collect

Combine

Compare

Compile

Complete

Comply

Compose

Compute

Conceptualize

Conclude

Condense

Conduct

Confer

Configure

Connect

Conserve

Consolidate

Construct

Consult

Contact

Continue

Contribute

Control

Convert

Convey

Convince

Coordinate

Correspond

Counsel

Critique

Cultivate

Customize

Decide

Declare

Decline

Decorate

Dedicate

Define

Delegate

Deliver

Demonstrate

Depreciate

Describe

Design

Detail Oriented

Determine

Develop

Development

Devise

Diagnose

Direct

Dispense

Distribute

Document

Draft

E–H

Edit

Educate

Effective

Efficient

Emphasize

Encourage

Energized

Enforce

Engineer

Enhance

Ensure

Enthusiastic

Establish

Estimate

Evaluate

Examine

Execute

Expand

Expedite

Experience

Explain

Fabricate

Facilitate

Finance

Focus

Forecast

Formulate

Foster

Fund

Furnish

Gain

Generate

Graduate

Greet

Guide

Handle

Help

Hire

Host

I–M

Identify

Illustrate

Implement

Improve

Improvise

Increase

Index

Influence

Inform

Initiate

Initiative

Innovate

Inspire

Install

Institute

Integrate

Interact

Interested

Interview

Introduce

Investigate

Itemize

Join

Justify

Knowledge

Launch

Leadership

Learn

Lecture

Lessen

Lift

Link

Listen

Maintain

Manage

Management

Manipulate

Map

Market

Measure

Mediate

Merge

Mobilize

Modify

Monitor

Motivate

N–S

Negotiate

Observe

Obtain

Open

Operate

Order

Organize

Originate

Outpace

Outperform

Participate

Passion

Perform

Persuade

Plan

Practical

Prepare

Present

Prevent

Printed

Prioritize

Priority

Process

Produce

Professional

Program

Project

Promote

Propose

Prospect

Prove

Provide

Publicize

Purchase

Pursue

Qualify

Run

Rate

Reach

Receive

Recommend

Reconcile

Record

Recruit

Reduce

Refer

Refocus

Regulate

Reorganize

Repair

Replace

Report

Represent

Research

Resolve

Respond

Responsibility

Restore

Restructure

Results

Results-Oriented

Retrieve

Review

Revise

Revitalize

Schedule

Screen

Search

Secure

Seize

Select

Send

Serve

Share

Showcase

Simplify

Skill

Solution

Solve

Sort

Specialize

Specify

Sponsor

Staff

Standardize

Start

Succeed

Suggest

Summarize

Supervise

Supply

Support

Surpass

Survey

Sustain

T–Z

Target

Teach

Team

Team Player

Test

Timely

Track

Trade

Train

Transact

Transcribe

Transform

Translate

Transmit

Transport

Tutor

Unite

Update

Upgrade

Use

Utilize

Validate

Value

Verify

View

Volunteer

Watch

Weigh

Witness

Win

Write

Yield 

Related: Best Resume Writing Services

Resume Words: Power Words And Adjectives To Use In A Resume

Why is it important to know which words to use in a resume?

Knowing which words to use in your resume is important because good resume words command the attention of hiring managers. The correct words can highlight the differences between you and other applicants while clearly illustrating your professional strengths.

Here are two versions of an experience section bullet point. The first bullet does not use actionable resume action words:

Based on this example, it’s impossible for recruiters to determine what the candidate actually did, and whether they succeeded at their job.

Here’s that same bullet, but with the language optimized using powerful resume action words:

Good resume words make this bullet point more interesting and informative. Simply using more descriptive words helped this candidate more clearly convey what they accomplished at their past job, making their application stronger and more likely to be noticed by a hiring manager.

Which resume action words should I use?

You should use resume action words that best reflect your experience and professional skills.

To help you choose the right action verbs for your resume, we’ve made a list of powerful examples, and broken them down by the resume skills they highlight.

Best Action Words for a Resume

Here’s our list of strong resume action words organized according to when you would use them.

Use them in your experience section to power up your resume and show recruiters you’re an expert at what you do.

1. You communicated something effectively

Highlight your communication skills with these strong resume action words:

2. You managed a project or people

It’s no secret that companies value employees with good management skills.

But saying that you’re “good at management” on your resume isn’t going to impress the person reading it. Instead of using vague language, these words for your resume prove to employers you know how to manage employees and projects:

3. You worked with others to accomplish something

Recruiters are always looking for candidates who know how to collaborate.

But how do you communicate that you’re a team player without using the overused term “team player”? Easy – any of these powerful words to include in your resume will do it:

4. You kept things organized

No matter what your job is, good organizational skills are a must. Staying on task, time management, and being able to balance different priorities are each important aspects of being a valuable employee.

However, hiring managers see “organized” listed on resumes all the time. To stand out, here are some words to use in your resume that highlight your organizational skills:

5. You achieved results

Employers love to see what you’ve accomplished over the course of your career. Show hiring managers what you’re capable of by using these resume action verbs:

6. You innovated new solutions

Employers are always looking for candidates who have the ability to innovate. Use these resume power words to show hiring managers that you can think creatively:

How to use resume action words

Even the best resume words are not a replacement for clear and descriptive writing.

To maximize the impact of your resume, focus on providing impressive, quantified examples of your experience. Then, use strong resume words to complement your work history and qualifications.

Take a look at these examples to get a better idea of how to use action words in your resume:

While it may sound impressive, this sentence doesn’t actually provide much quantifiable information for a hiring manager to work with. What kind of budget objectives did this candidate handle? What types of expenditures were they overseeing?

This is a good example of using resume words in a work experience bullet because the candidate:

tells you directly what they accomplished, and how they accomplished it by using numbers and percentages.

uses strong resume action verbs to emphasize the impact of their achievement on the company.

If you use resume action verbs to strengthen concrete examples of your accomplishments rather than to hide your weaknesses, your resume will immediately make a better case for your hireability.

Good Resume Adjectives

Strong resume adjectives are a great way to highlight and emphasize your experience.

Our key tip for successfully using adjectives is combining them with accomplishments on your resume. This way, they enhance your professional achievements rather than just take up space.

To help you improve your word choice, here are some good adjectives for your resume:

Resume Buzzwords to Avoid

Just as some words can enhance your resume, there are also words that can make it less viable to hiring managers. They’re called resume buzzwords, and employers don’t like them.

Fortunately, they’re easy to spot. Resume buzzwords always have two things in common:

They’re overused – hiring managers see them a lot

They talk up your experience, but don’t actually convey any information of substance

Here are five common resume buzzwords, and what you should use instead:

Consider using one of these action verbs instead:

Use Effective Words for Your Resume

Now that you know the best words to include in your resume, it’s time to polish up your application and apply for jobs.

Just remember that using power words is no replacement for knowing how to write a strong resume. Before you add active resume words to your experience section, make sure that each sentence you write is:

Ultimately, your resume should be easy-to-read and accurately describe your qualifications in a manner that shows hiring managers what you’re capable of.

Resume Keywords: 500+ Best Words To Use In A Resume

Why?

Recruiters are pressed for time. They don’t even read resumes; they scan them in search of important terms.

Worse than that-

They’re even too busy to do the scanning themselves and use automated tools, called applicant tracking systems.

Want your resume to get read?

Want that interview?

Want that job?

This guide will show you:

What resume keywords employers look for on job applications.

How to find the right keywords to beat the other candidates and get the interview.

How to hack the ATS to honestly include words you don’t qualify for.

A bonus free PDF list of 500+ resume keywords sorted by industry.

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1. Understand What Are Resume Keywords and Why You Must Use Them

First, what are keywords for resumes?

Resume keywords are words which matter most to employers. Keywords represent attributes crucial for the job.

If you possess those skills and experience, you need to show it off in a way that is easy to understand by humans and robots alike.

So, you need to use resume keywords-

And use them right.

Why?

Your resume isn’t read, it’s scanned.

First, by automated software-

ATS stands for an applicant tracking system -software which assists companies and human resources with the hiring process.

ATS scans all candidates’ resumes and assigns a score based on each candidate’s compatibility to the position.

Once an employer adds the ~250 resumes they get for each job posting into the ATS, they can filter the candidates based on resume keywords they’re looking for.

For example:

Of those 250 resumes, 50 have Skill A, 75 have Skill B, but only 5 have both A and B.

Those last 5 will receive a call for an interview.

According to ERE, the ATS will filter out about 75% of all job applications per job ad.

Second, by the actual recruiter-

Most recruiters spend merely seconds (or minutes at best) looking at resume just to make sure the candidate meets their requirements.

If you don’t have the right experience and skills (or don’t know how to present them!), you’re done. You’ll never hear back.

So, how to make sure you pass the test?

Finding the right words in the job ad and using them as your resume keywords is a must.

The next section will teach you how to do it.

Expert Hint: To see how your resume stacks up on the ATS, use a resume keyword finder like Jobscan. You simply copy-paste the job ad in one box, your resume in the second box, and voila! It gives you a score on how well your resume matches, as well as the best resume tips for optimizations.

2. Start Your Hunt for Resume Keywords from the Job Listing

That’s right-

Prepare your targeted resume with the job ad in front of you and use its language as your resume keywords.

Let’s look at this sample job description snippet for an operations associate:

Qualifications:

Experience with MS OfficeBachelor’s Degree preferredExperience using Hubspot, Xsellco or other CRM softwareExperience using back-end for Amazon, Walmart, eBay or other similar online marketplacesExperience in a similar position preferred or experience managing a small team

To be qualified for this position, the candidate needs to have and mention their experience with CRM software and the largest online marketplaces. That’s in addition to expertise in managing a small team.

Have this experience but fail to include it?

It’s like you never had any experience at all-they’ll toss your resume.

Use wording that matches the job description so you have the best chance of appeasing the ATS scan.

To succeed in this particular example, on your resume you’d have to include the knowledge of “MS Office,” instead of separating it into “Word,” “Excel,” etc.

However-

Don’t copy everything!

They want a resume from a well-qualified candidate, not a plagiarized version of their original job ad- 32% of employers auto-reject applications that copy too much text from the ad.

That above example lists some easy-to-follow nouns to add here and there in your resume.

But now, let’s look at another sample text for a project coordinator:

Position Summary: The Project Coordinator will provide integral support to the office through implementation of all logistics as they pertain to Early Childhood project meetings, professional development support, communications, and other office-related work. Will provide ongoing resource management to ensure all program resources are efficiently utilized and maintained. Will ensure project transparency with timely and effective project communication, escalating issues and risks as appropriate. Performs related work.

Paragraphs like these are harder to parse, but they’re just as rich in resume keywords as any list of responsibilities or qualifications.

For keywords such as “timely and effective project communication,” use that phrase in your heading statement (objective or summary).

Alternatively, talk about this in your job experience section from a past position.

Expert Hint: Keywords should never be repeated in a resume? Untrue. You can highlight your expertise in a given skill or task by using it more than once as a keyword on your resume. This increases the keyword density and will help you to match better. But only do this on the most crucial keywords!

3. Discover More Resume Keywords on Your Own

Sometimes the job listing won’t give you all the powerful keywords for resumes.

In these cases, you just have to find them on your own.

But it’s easy-

Here are the best places to find power words to use as your resume keywords and industry buzzwords:

Wikipedia – Search your prospective job title to find tools of the trade, general responsibilities, and more.

Industry organizations and trade websites -You’ll find lots of relevant industry jargon in case studies and interviews with experts in your field.

The company’s website – Your future resume keywords sleep in the company’s scope of operations, values, future plans, etc.

The BLS OOH – The US Bureau of Labor Statistics has their Occupational Outlook Handbook, profiling all the common job titles out there.

Google – Search for “[industry] resume keywords” and you’ll get even more suggestions.

You can search for resume keywords based on the position (e.g., administrative assistant keywords), industry (e.g., marketing resume keywords), and seniority (e.g., management resume keywords).

Let’s look at some examples of each.

List of keywords to use in a resume for finance:

FILO

credit

profit & loss

loan management

return on investment

financial management

portfolio

loan recovery

turnaround

List of resume keywords related to management: List of keywords to use on a resume for human resources:

staffing

sourcing

training

diversity

contract negotiation

wage administration

salary administration

succession planning

compensation

Finally, don’t underestimate the importance of action words for resumes.

Here are some of the best resume action words to use:

The right resume power words help you stand out.

Lack of resume buzzwords and powerful resume verbs will leave you unnoticed.

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Expert Hint: When writing you resume, avoid negative words, passive voice, “I” words, cliched statements, and the “references available upon request” phrase. They all will hurt your chances of landing a job interview.

4. Add Your Resume Keywords Strategically

TripSuggest is seeking a competent travel booking agent with at least two years’ experience. Expert knowledge of Sabre CRS is required. Ideal candidate will have strong interpersonal skills and communication skills. Familiarity with Microsoft Office a plus.

Let’s start with an example job ad:

Let’s dive in.

Most keywords you’ll take from a job listing like this will fit into your resume skills section.

Your skills section is a great place to add both soft skills they’re looking for (e.g., interpersonal skills, communication skills) and hard skills (e.g., Microsoft Office, Sabre CRS).

However-

If it is more crucial to the position, give it a boost by speaking of these also in other areas, such as your resume summary or work experience.

Competent travel booking agent with 3+ years experience with both Amadeus and Sabre CRS…

Here’s a sample resume summary:

See that?

We brought your CRS expertise out of the depths of the skills section to the heading statement-which is sure to get more eye time.

On top of that, we satisfied the experience length requirements, and we used their wording mentioning the specific position being applied for.

And, as far as technical skills (e.g. Sabre CRS) are concerned, you can also bring it up in a separate certifications section:

– 2018 Sabre Personal Trainer certificate from The Travel Institute – 98% score

Certifications & Awards

Not bad, right?

Finally, soft skills, such as leadership or problem-solving, are more vague, so you can additionally hint at them in your hobbies and interests section.

For example, an opening for a supervisor can get a subtle nod at your leadership skills by mentioning how you like to coach the junior softball team in your spare time.

There are many ways to add strong words to use on a resume!

Expert Hint: How many resume keywords should you use? 25 to 30 is a good number, all parts of a resume included. Make it a healthy mix of words from the job ad and words you come up with yourself (with the help of Wikipedia, Google, etc.).

5. Reuse Your Resume Keywords in Your Email & Cover Letter

The resume is not the only document you’re writing or handing in.

You’ll likely send it in an email and accompany it with a cover letter.

Therefore, to additionally boost your chances of winning that job interview invitation, you have to reuse your resume keywords in your email to the recruiter and in your cover letter.

The cover letter is often read prior to the hiring manager getting around to your resume. On top of that, they could choose to use the ATS to parse your cover letter for keywords, as well.

Do it especially with those resume keywords you feel are most important to determining your fate.

You can also use your cover letter to reword and explain particular keywords from your resume.

Also, try to “speak the company’s language” on your cover letter by using their tone and energy. You can get the gist of it on the company’s website. Also, check out our best cover letter tips to tweak your letter of application even more.

If you’re interested in the job, please use the phrase “Sales Position 34SK-T Application” as your email subject line.

Never miss it!

Use the required phrase as your email subject. Don’t rephrase it. If you do, your application may never reach the recruiter.

Expert Hint: One keyword you might have overlooked-the company name. Adding the company name to your cover letter and email (and even your resume objective statement) shows you took the time to customize your application just for them.

6. How to Honestly Add Keywords You Might Not Qualify For

That being said, what happens if you are on the fence about including a particular keyword?

Never lie on your resume.

Let’s look at this job ad example for an accountant:

Bachelor’s degree in Accounting or related field

Qualifications and Skills:

Your situation?

You are finishing up your last semester at college.

Here’s what you can do in your resume’s education section:

Majoring in AccountingHunter College, New York, NYExpected Graduation: 2019

See that?

One semester remaining until bachelor’s degree.

This gets those important keywords (“bachelor’s degree” and “accounting”) onto your resume without lying about it, and helps you to pass the ATS test.

Then, when the hiring manager does the human check, they can make their own decision.

Double your impact with a matching resume and cover letter combo. Use our cover letter builder and make your application documents pop out.

Expert Hint: When adding keywords on a resume, copy their naming conventions. If they use “BA,” you use “BA.” If they say “bachelor’s degree,” you say “bachelor’s degree.” This will get you covered for the exact keywords they’ll enter into the ATS.

CREATE YOUR COVER LETTER NOW

Key Points

Here’s a recap of all the important things you have to know about resume keywords:

Resume keywords are important words or phrases employers search for in your documents.

The applicant tracking systems reject resumes lacking keywords.

Use the job ad as your guide to find the best words for your resume.

Search for a list of resume keywords on Google, Wikipedia, etc.

Add keywords all over your resume, not just the skills section.

Reuse the keywords in your email and cover letter to round it all out.

Don’t be dishonest by adding keywords for skills you don’t qualify for.

How To Effectively Use Resume Action Words

Set yourself apart with resume action words that describe your contributions.

These days, employers want to know what you can achieve for their company – simply utilizing job descriptions on your resume isn’t enough. After all, there are hundreds of applicants lined up who are qualified for the job. You have to stand out.

Set yourself apart with action verbs, achieving language, and resume writing that describes what you have contributed rather than what you have done on a daily basis.

What are action verbs?

Think of Yoda and his notorious phrases. Then, don’t be like him. Sentences like “The Dark Side I sense in you” are not what you should place in your resume. Yoda often speaks in the passive voice, where the object comes before the verb in a sentence. For example, “The ball was thrown by John” is in the passive voice. These sentences are longer, more difficult to read and give an overall weaker effect. You can create more impact by writing in active voice – placing the object after the verb. For example, “John threw the ball.”

How can I use action verbs in my resume?

Using action verbs in resume writing is as easy as any other form of writing, as long as you know what to include and what to look for. Here are two tests to determine if you are using passive voice in your resume writing:

Verb Test: Look for helping verbs, especially forms of the verb “to be.”

“By You” Test: Can you insert the phrase “by you” after the verb? Does the sentence still make grammatical sense? If yes, this signifies passive voice.

Scan the resume for these warning signs and replace passive resume writing with more active verbs and sentences. Here are a few examples of passive resume sentences:

A 20 percent revenue growth was realized in our department over two years.

A promotion to supervisor was awarded to me after only one year of service.

Responsibility was recognized as one of my strengths.

Here are the same examples rewritten using active voice:

My team realized 20 percent revenue growth over two years.

After only one year, I earned a promotion to supervisor.

Recognized for responsibility and proactive decisions.

The only time passive voice is appropriate is when you want to draw more attention to results instead of yourself. This is very rare, and you should focus on your achievements rather than your company’s results.

Related: How to Maximize Resume Action Words and Wow an Employer

Which action verbs are most effective?

Not only do you need to use action verbs in your resume, but you also must select those that fit your industry and create an impact. Here are a few general, strong action verbs to include in your resume:

Related: The Best Words to Use in a Resume

Make your resume shine with achievements

Another action-word strategy is to use “achieving” language rather than “doing” language. How do you determine if the sentence is doing or achieving? Ask yourself these three simple questions:

Can anyone perform this function?

Is this the standard, run-of-the-mill description?

Did any results come from this action?

If your answers are yes, yes, and no, you are listing descriptions that only show what you can do. What you want instead is to show what you have achieved.

Here are a few examples of “doing” sentences, and how to convert them into “achieving” sentences:

Doing: Responsible for inventory control and ordering products.

Achieving: Optimize inventory by monitoring for product shortages and ensuring efficient service usage.

Doing: Help company sell more products and gain revenue.

Achieving: Increase profit margins by creating effective sales plans and implementing strategies to solidify client retention.

Takeaways

Using action verbs and active voice makes all the difference in your resume, so it’s worth the extra effort. Show the employer what you can bring to the table by listing past achievements and notable contributions, and you’ll increase your chance of getting an interview. Just keep these questions in mind and your resume-writing experience will go smoother:

Does the sentence leave the option for results, or is it just a description?

Have I been writing in active or passive voice?

Is this an exceptional description, or can anyone do this?

Are you using action verbs in your resume? Request a free resume critique today to check and see!

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