Đề Xuất 2/2023 # The Ultimate Strong Verbs List That’Ll Supercharge Your Writing # Top 6 Like | Beiqthatgioi.com

Đề Xuất 2/2023 # The Ultimate Strong Verbs List That’Ll Supercharge Your Writing # Top 6 Like

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Do you ever wonder why a grammatically correct sentence you’ve written just lies there like a dead fish?

I sure have.

But still the sentence doesn’t work.

Even Mark Twain was quoted, regarding adjectives: “When in doubt, strike it out.”

That’s not to say there’s no place for adjectives. I used three in the title and first paragraph of this post alone.

There’s no quicker win for you and your manuscript than ferreting out and eliminating flabby verbs and replacing them with vibrant ones.

How To Know Which Verbs Need Replacing

Your first hint is your own discomfort with a sentence. Odds are it features a snooze-inducing verb.

As you hone your ferocious self-editing skills, train yourself to exploit opportunities to replace a weak verb for a strong one.

At the end of this post I suggest a list of 249 vivid verbs you can experiment with to replace tired ones.

What constitutes a tired verb? Here’s what to look for:

3 Types of Verbs to Beware of in Your Prose

1. State-of-being verbs

What constitutes a tired verb? Here’s what to look for:

These are passive as opposed to powerful:

Is

Am

Are

Was

Were

Be

Being

Been

Have

Has

Had

Do

Does

Did

Shall

Will

Should

Would

May

Might

Must

Can

Could

Am I saying these should never appear in your writing? Of course not. You’ll find them in this piece. But when a sentence lies limp, you can bet it contains at least one of these. Determining when a state-of-being verb is the culprit creates a problem—and finding a better, more powerful verb to replace it—is what makes us writers. [Note how I replaced the state-of-being verbs in this paragraph.]

Resist the urge to consult a thesaurus for the most exotic verb you can find. I consult such references only for the normal word that carries power but refuses to come to mind.

I would suggest even that you consult my list of powerful verbs only after you have exhausted all efforts to come up with one on your own. You want Make your prose to be your own creation, not yours plus Roget or Webster or Jenkins. [See how easy they are to spot and fix?]

Examples

Impotent: The man was walking on the platform.

Powerful: The man strode along the platform.

Impotent: Jim is a lover of country living.

Powerful: Jim treasures country living.

Impotent: There are three things that make me feel the way I do…

Powerful: Three things convince me…

Powerful verbs are strong enough to stand alone.

Examples

The fox ran quickly dashed through the forest.

She menacingly looked glared at her rival.

He secretly listened eavesdropped while they discussed their plans.

3. Verbs with -ing suffixes

Examples

Before: He was walking…

After: He walked…

Before: She was loving the idea of…

After: She loved the idea of…

Before: The family was starting to gather…

After: The family started to gather…

The Strong Verbs List

Absorb

Advance

Advise

Alter

Amend

Amplify

Attack

Balloon

Bash

Batter

Beam

Beef

Blab

Blast

Bolt

Boost

Brief

Broadcast

Brood

Burst

Bus

Bust

Capture

Catch

Charge

Chap

Chip

Clasp

Climb

Clutch

Collide

Command

Commune

Cower

Crackle

Crash

Crave

Crush

Dangle

Dash

Demolish

Depart

Deposit

Detect

Deviate

Devour

Direct

Discern

Discover

Dismantle

Download

Drag

Drain

Drip

Drop

Eavesdrop

Engage

Engulf

Enlarge

Ensnare

Envelop

Erase

Escort

Expand

Explode

Explore

Expose

Extend

Extract

Eyeball

Fight

Fish

Fling

Fly

Frown

Fuse

Garble

Gaze

Glare

Gleam

Glisten

Glitter

Gobble

Govern

Grasp

Gravitate

Grip

Groan

Grope

Growl

Guide

Gush

Hack

Hail

Heighten

Hobble

Hover

Hurry

Ignite

Illuminate

Inspect

Instruct

Intensify

Intertwine

Impart

Jostle

Journey

Lash

Launch

Lead

Leap

Locate

Lurch

Lurk

Magnify

Mimic

Mint

Moan

Modify

Multiply

Muse

Mushroom

Mystify

Notice

Notify

Obtain

Oppress

Order

Paint

Park

Peck

Peek

Peer

Perceive

Picture

Pilot

Pinpoint

Place

Plant

Plop

Pluck

Plunge

Poison

Pop

Position

Power

Prickle

Probe

Prune

Realize

Recite

Recoil

Refashion

Refine

Remove

Report

Retreat

Reveal

Reverberate

Revitalize

Revolutionize

Revolve

Rip

Rise

Ruin

Rush

Rust

Saunter

Scamper

Scan

Scorch

Scrape

Scratch

Scrawl

Seize

Serve

Shatter

Shepherd

Shimmer

Shine

Shock

Shrivel

Sizzle

Skip

Skulk

Slash

Slide

Slink

Slip

Slump

Slurp

Smash

Smite

Snag

Snarl

Sneak

Snowball

Soar

Spam

Sparkle

Sport

Sprinkle

Stare

Starve

Steal

Steer

Storm

Strain

Stretch

Strip

Stroll

Struggle

Stumble

Supercharge

Supersize

Surge

Survey

Swell

Swipe

Swoon

Tail

Tattle

Toddle

Transfigure

Transform

Travel

Treat

Trim

Trip

Trudge

Tussle

Uncover

Unearth

Untangle

Unveil

Usher

Veil

Wail

Weave

Wind

Withdraw

Wreck

Wrench

Wrest

Wrestle

Wring

Yank

Zing

Zap

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351 Strong Verbs To Make Your Writing Pop, Fizz And Sparkle

Why do the words jump off this page?

Why does this writing feel energetic and strong?

Why is it so fast-paced?

And do you wonder why your draft text seems a tad limp in comparison?

It happens to all of us.

First drafts often require an injection of power and pizzazz. First drafts are full of weak verbs, and weak verbs make your writing limp, flabby, and listless.

In contrast, strong verbs add action, vitality, color, and zest. So, the “secret” to writing with gusto is to choose stronger verbs.

What are strong verbs?

Strong verbs engage your senses, and help readers picture a scene (verbs in bold):

You feel the air reverberating when he slams his fist on the table. The teacups jiggle, his face reddens, and his voice thunders.

Strong verbs allow readers to visualize actions. Instead of only reading words, they’re drawn into your writing, experiencing your story.

But strong verbs don’t need to convey powerful action. Subtle action can evoke powerful feelings, too. For instance:

He cradles the baby, strokes her dark hair, tickles her chin, and hums a lullaby.

Strong verbs are precise and concrete. In contrast, weak verbs are abstract and generic-they don’t help you visualize a scene. Examples of weak verbs are “to be,” “to provide,” “to add,” and “to utilize.” You can’t picture these words.

You can’t picture “provide feedback,” but you can visualize “shouting,” “lecturing,” and “scribbling.”

Strong verbs breathe life into abstract ideas

Over the weekend, I read Ray Bradbury’s “Zen in the Art of Writing.” I enjoyed his word choice, and I loved how his verbs breathe life into abstract concepts, like storytelling and the Muse.

For instance, he describes how he started writing stories based on lists of nouns:

And the stories began to burst, to explode from those memories, hidden in the nouns, lost in the lists.

And he writes about the Muse:

The Muse, then, is the most terrified of all the virgins. She starts if she hears a sound, pales if you ask her questions, spins and vanishes if you disturb her dress.

And on eating books:

I tore out the pages, ate them with salt, doused them with relish, gnawed on the bindings, turned the chapters with my tongue!

Strong verbs in business writing

You might think strong verbs are only for fiction writers.

But that’s untrue.

Here’s Nancy Duarte in her book ” Resonate ” (about engaging your audience with story-based presentations):

Throughout history, presenter-to-audience exchanges have rallied revolutions, spread innovation, and spawned movements.

And:

When a great story is told, we lean forward, and our hearts race as the story unfolds.

And:

Haven’t you often wished you could make customers, employees, investors, or students snap, crackle, pop, and move to the new place they need to be in order to create a new future?

Here’s an example of Apple’s copy:

So whether you’re listening to music, watching videos, or making speakerphone calls, iPhone 7 lets you crank it up. Way, way up.

And:

Apple Watch Series 2 counts more than just steps. It tracks all the ways you move throughout the day, whether you’re walking between meetings, doing cartwheels with your kids, or hitting the gym.

“To do” in the last sentence is, of course, a weak verb. Apple’s copywriters could have changed “doing cartwheels with your kids” into “cartwheeling with your kids” without disrupting the rhythm and making the sentence stronger.

It is nouns and verbs, not their assistants, that give good writing its toughness and color.

~ Strunk and White (in the Elements of Style)

How to choose strong verbs

No clear distinction exists between strong and weak verbs. It’s a gliding scale, and it’s up to you as a writer to decide how strong you’d like your verbs to be.

For instance, “to walk” is stronger than “to go” because it gives you an indication of how someone moved. But stronger options would be: to saunter, to hike, to shuffle, to trudge, to stride, or to plod. Each of these verbs gives you an indication of how someone walked:

to saunter: picture a girl walking rather leisurely, perhaps peeking into the shop windows

to hike: picture a woman in walking boots with a backpack, walking at a good pace

to shuffle: picture an elderly woman moving ahead gingerly, hardly lifting her feet

to trudge: picture a girl in wellies making a big effort, perhaps walking through the snow or mud

to stride: picture a lady walking as if on the catwalk, with long strides

to plod: picture a tired woman with sagging shoulders, walking rather tiredly

Strong verbs can also be used for abstract language. For instance, you could say you generated ideas during your brainstorm session. But how did your ideas arrive? For instance:

A few ideas popped into your mind

Your mind exploded with ideas

A stream of ideas burst forward

Ideas first trickled, then gushed forth

The brainstorm session spawned a stream of ideas

Strong verbs are more precise than weak verbs; they can paint clear pictures-even of abstract activities like thinking and generating ideas.

How to play with your verbs

While quietly sitting at her wooden desk, she slowly formulated her thoughts and worked really hard to write her blog post. The next day she felt apprehensive and nervously hit publish. Would her audience be interested enough to read her content word-by-word?

To add energy to the text, the first step is to strip the content back to its bare bones:

While quietly sitting at her wooden desk, she slowly formulated her thoughts and worked really hard to write her blog post. The next day she felt apprehensive and nervously hit publish. Would her audience be interested enough to read her content word-by-word?

The stripped down version lacks nuance and color. So, let’s try stronger verbs and add a little context:

For hours, she sat at her desk. She wracked her brain, and slaved over her words to produce a blog post. And the next day? She hit publish with trepidation. Would her audience gobble up her words?

The thesaurus is your friend. Use a thesaurus to find more precise alternatives for weak verbs.

Your word choice shapes your voice

Finding your voice is about experimentation.

Write a first draft quickly using the words coming up into your mind.

Then, review your draft. In which sentences can you replace weak with strong verbs?

Which verbs can be more precise? Which verbs are sensory? Which verbs have a strong emotional connotation?

Play with your words. Have fun. And discover your voice.

A list of 351 strong verbs to inspire your writing

The list below is not exhaustive as many more strong verbs exist.

You can use a thesaurus to find other strong verbs, or keep an eye out for interesting verbs while reading.

To determine whether a verb is strong, ask yourself whether the verb has a sensory connotation. Does it make you hear, feel, smell, taste or see something? Does it paint a clear picture?

Onomatopoeic verbs

Onomatopoeic words express a sound, so they’re a sub segment of sensory verbs.

The word onomatopoeia comes from the Greek for making words-the sound has formed the word that represents it.

Sensory verbs

Sensory verbs are strong because they paint clear pictures in readers’ minds and make them feel something.

Examples: To sparkle, to shine, to brighten, to wipe out, to muddle, to dazzle, to spark, to glow, to shimmer, to glimmer, to beam, to ripple, to tickle, to thrill, to explode, to burst, to guzzle, to gobble up, to breeze through, to drool, to spit, to roar, to thunder, to reverberate, to resonate, to rumble, to flavor, to smooth, to rub, to tremble, to whisper, to vibrate, to pulsate, to throb, to quiver, to buzz, to sip, to slurp, to slobber, to blemish, to applaud, to clash, to bounce, to blend, to shake, to savor, to tantalize, to tittilate, to pinch, to stroke, to brush, to bathe, to hose, to douse, to shower, to drench, to spray, to sprinkle, to trickle, to splash, to seep, to slide, to slump, to tumble, to nose-dive, to fly, to float, to clog, to swoop, to propel, to dig in, to dip, to surge, to wolf down, to shovel, to gulp down, to roll, to soar, to curl up, to unfold, to weave, to swipe, to tear, to polish, to pale, to vanish, to spin, to weave, to intertwine, to buckle down, to button up, to pierce, to stick to

Strong action verbs-intransitive

Action verbs propel a sentence forward, keeping readers engaged.

Instead of using weaker words like walk or move, try to describe the movement more precisely so readers can imagine the movement.

Intransitive verbs can stand on their own, without an object. For instance, I walk is intransitive because there’s no object that is walked by me. I hit you is transitive-you are the object as you are hit by me.

Examples: To stumble, to wobble, to swing, to lurch, to glide, to zip, to sail, to crash, to dive, to tiptoe, to pussyfoot, to duck, to flip-flop, to dilly-dally, to linger, to stall, to sway, to sink, to spurt, to hurry, to dash, to nip, to race, to whiz, to flit, to chew, to stroll, to sashay, to amble, to plod, to ramble, to loiter, to meander, to roam, to snake, to gallivant, to twist, to dance, to jig, to jive, to waltz, to tango, to swirl, to hop, to trip, to skip, to whirl, to gallop, to stride, to zoom, to trot, to dart, to sprint, to shoot, to leap

Strong action verbs-transitive

Below follow examples of words related to holding, pushing, or hitting something.

You can use these verbs for both concrete and abstract concepts. For instance, you can jump-start an engine or you can jump-start your career. You can squeeze a stress ball, or you can squeeze more to-do’s into your calendar. A cow regurgitates grass, and a blogger may regurgitate worn-out topics.

Negative emotional verbs

A verb like to fail has a strong negative connotation but doesn’t necessarily paint an unambiguous or vivid picture in a reader’s mind. Failure comes in different forms-you can marginally fail an exam or your start-up can fail utterly, and the feelings associated can vary. Do you sob for days? Do you fret you’re a failure? Do you feel crippled or bruised by the failure? Do you feel devastated or shrug your shoulders?

Below follow examples of more sensory verbs with negative connotations:

Examples: To choke, to strangle, to smother, to gag, to suffocate, to throttle, to cry, to howl, to sob, to blubber, to scream, to groan, to moan, to fret, to fume, to bleed, to nag, to steal, to kidnap, to ransack, to loot, to pilfer, to plunder, to snitch, to puke, to vomit, to yelp, to bark, to growl, to grumble, to mutter, to spout, to suck, to scold, to plummet, to collapse, to skid, to agitate, to slave, to labor, to wreck, to ruin, to cripple, to devastate, to decimate, to trash, to shatter, to torpedo, to sabotage, to capsize, to maul, to crush, to slash, to bruise, to hijack

Positive emotional verbs

The verbs below paint strong positive imagery in your reader’s mind.

Your apple tree can blossom, and your blog can flourish. A magician might be spellbinding, but your blog posts can hypnotize readers, too.

Examples: To flourish, to thrive, to bloom, to blossom, to mushroom, to smile, to grin, to cheer, to raise, to boost, to lift, to bolster, to invigorate, to energize, to excite, to enliven, to fortify, to hearten, to embolden, to animate, to arouse, to hypnotize, to spellbind, to sweep off one’s feet, to fall in love, to treasure, to unclog, to clarify, to disentangle, to liberate, to relieve, to release, to unshackle, to cuddle, to nestle, to huddle, to snuggle, to embrace, to hug, to kiss, to massage, to cradle, to enfold, to envelop, to sprout

Note: This post was originally published on 14 February 2016; an expanded version was published on 12 June 2019.

One Piece: Unlimited World Red Strong Words List

Let’s take a look at the complete list below that reveals how to unlock all One Piece: Unlimited World Red Strong Words…

Index of One Piece: Unlimited World Red Guides: Here are most of the requirements for unlocking all the Strong Words:

1. Finish each quest once, because they all have at least 1 word as the default reward; except for the Boss Rivals and DLC quests. 2. From item exchange events in Trans Town you receive 12 words. Note: Stay idle in Trans Town to unlock these item exchange events**. 3. From getting over 100 balloons in the Balloon Mini-game you get 1 word. 4. A lot of words come as secret rare rewards from quests. 5. Treasure chests have some words as well.

** Item Exchange Examples:

A) At the side of the bridge on each side of the river there is a guy that exchanges one of the rare frogs for a item. B) The south guy gives can give 2 types of items: one of them you can exchange with a old lady for a mysterious item and the other you can exchange with a kid for another mysterious item (both NPCs are in the south). C) The north guy gives a item that you can use in the farm and get mysterious seed. Also you can plant the mysterious seed for a plant that you can get a flower to exchange with a woman (near the museum) for another mysterious item. D) You need 3 of each of those 4 mysterious items that I mentioned and exchange them with a girl at the west side of the south part of the town (bordering the water). E) Also each NPC only exchange items once per time you enter Trans Town.

Where to find all the unlocked Strong Words:

While you’re playing the game, press on the Start button to enter the Pause Menu. After that select Equip Custom Word or Set Item Word.

So in case you want to set an Item Word to the character you’re playing as, then you can select it from the on-screen menu.

To see from the full Strong Words overview what’s available to you, from the same Pause Menu go into the Info tab and select Word List.

Strong Word complete Gallery by Orthmann organized per character.

* Luffy Strong Words

* Zoro Strong Words

* Nami Strong Words

* Usopp Strong Words

* Sanji Strong Words

* Chopper Strong Words

* Robin Strong Words

* Franky Strong Words

* Brook Strong Words

* Other Strong Words

What are your favorite Strong Words to equip in One Piece: Unlimited World Red?

By Ferry Groenendijk: He is the founder and editor of Video Games Blogger. He loved gaming from the moment he got a Nintendo with Super Mario Bros. on his 8th birthday. Learn more about him here and connect with him on Twitter, Facebook and at Google+.

Action Verbs For Job Descriptions

Action verbs are the most effective verbs to use in job descriptions.

What is an action verb? It’s a verb that expresses physical or mental action.

Examples of action verbs:

The CEO motivates his team.

The developer writes code.

The accountant approves the balance sheet

An action verb is distinct from linking verbs (am, are, is, was, were, etc.).) and helping verbs (can, shall, will could,would, should, etc.).

It’s almost always a good idea to use action verbs for job descriptions instead of helping/linking verbs.

Below is a list of 169 action verbs for job descriptions (with their definitions). I’ve found these 169 to be the most useful in writing job descriptions here at Ongig. I’ve categorized them best I can though there’s a lot of overlap.

Note: If you want a little extra automated help on writing JDs better, check out The Top 6 Augmented Writing Tools for Job Descriptions. And, for even more tips on writing job descriptions, check out How to Write a Job Description — Best Practices & Examples.

Enjoy!

The Comprehensive List of Action Verbs for Job Descriptions

Action Verbs for Management & Leadership

Action VerbDefinition

AchieveTo bring to a successful end.

AdviseOffer suggestions about the best course of action.

AppointSet officially, arrange.

ApproveAccept as satisfactory; exercise final authority with regard to commitment of

AssignSpecify or designate tasks or duties to be performed by others.

AuthorizeApprove.

DecideSelect a course of action.

DelegateTo entrust to another

DevelopTo cause to grow or expand.

DetermineTo resolve or fix conclusively or authoritatively.

DirectTo cause to turn, move, or point undeviatingly or to follow a straight course

EnforceTo effect or gain by force. To carry out effectively.

EstablishTo institute permanently by enactment or agreement.

Executeto carry out fully : put completely into effect

InitiateSet going or introduce.

ManageTo handle or direct with a degree of skill.

OverseeTo manage or coordinate.

RejectTo refuse to accept, consider or submit to.

RequireTo ask for by right and authority, request.

SuperviseTo be in charge of.

MotivateTo move or drive someone to an action.

Action Verbs for Design & Creation

Action VerbDefinition

CreateProduce through imaginative skill.

CodeTo write computer/software code.

DesignTo create, fashion, execute, or construct according to plan.

DevelopDisclose, discover, perfect or unfold a plan; includes to “develop” software.

DeviseCome up with something new by combinations or applications of ideas.

IllustrateTo enlighten.

InventTo create something.

ProgramTo write code for (e.g. a software application).

Action Verbs for Exchange & Transactions

Action VerbDefinition

AcceptGive admittance or approval to.

AcquireCome into possession or control of an item or items.

ArrangeMake preparation for; put into proper order.

BudgetTo plan allotment of (funds, time, etc.).

BuyAcquire possession, ownership or rights to the use of services, items.

CollectTo gather.

DeliverSend or bring a desired object.

DistributeDeliver or hand out to several or many.

ExchangeGive and receive reciprocally.

ForwardSend goods or information onward.

FurnishProvide or equip with what is needed.

GatherBring together or collect parts of a group.

GetObtain or receive.

GiveGrant or yield to another.

Issue”To put forth or distribute usually officially”.

NegotiateTo bring to settlement.

ObtainGain or possess.

ProcureGet possession or obtain by particular care and effort.

ProvideTo supply or make available.

PurchaseGain or acquire by labor, money.

RecallCall back or cancel.

ReceiveCome into possession of or acquire an item, idea.

RecruitIncrease numbers of a group or bring in new members.

RenderDeliver or hand down.

SecurePut beyond hazard or receive lasting control.

SellGive up property in exchange for money.

SendDeliver or dispatch as means of communication or delivery.

SolicitTo make a petition or request for services, money.

SubmitTo present or propose to another for review, consideration, or decision.

SupplyMake materials available for use.

TakeGet or seize into possession.

TransferPass over from one person to another.

WithdrawTo draw back or remove.

InitiateTo begin.

InstallTo set up for use.

OriginateTo begin or start or take origin of.

Action Verbs for Launch, Speed & Execution

Action VerbDefinition

AccelerateTo make faster.

ActivateTo make something reactive or more reactive.

EncourageTo give courage, spirit or confidence to.

ExpediteTo speed up.

FurtherTo help forward or promote.

ImplementCarry out or fulfill by taking action.

Action Verbs for Analysis & Review

Action VerbDefinition

CalculateMake a mathematical computation.

EstimateTo determine roughly the size, extent, or nature of.

ForecastPredict future events based on specific assumptions.

FormulatePut into a systemized expression or statement.

AnalyzeSeparate into elements and critically examine.

AppraiseGive an expert judgment of worth or merit.

AscertainFind out or learn with certainty.

CheckTo proof or review for errors.

CompareTo examine characteristics to discover similarities or differences.

ConsiderTo observe or think about with regard to taking some action.

CriticizeTo evaluate and judge merits or faults.

Evaluateto determine the significance, worth, or condition of usually by careful appraisal and study’.

ExamineInvestigate in order to determine progress, fitness or knowledge.

ForecastPredict future events based on specific assumptions.

IdentifyThe act of proving identity.

InspectExamine materials, equipment, reports, work, etc., to determine quality, suitability for use, etc.

InterpretExplain something to others.

InterviewObtain information through questioning.

InvestigateUncover facts by systematically finding them, conducting a search, and examining various sources.

MeasureControl or regulate by a standard or in measured amounts.

RateEstimate or determine the relative value, rank, or amount of an item.

ResearchTo search or investigate exhaustively.

ResolveDeal with a problem, dilemma successfully.

ReviewTo examine or study again.

SolveFind a solution, answer, or explanation for a question or problem.

StudyApply thought to any subject of investigation in order to arrive at the most suitable conclusion.

SummarizeTo tell and reduce a story, idea.

SurveyExamine a condition, situation or value.

TestTo try out.

WeighTo consider the importance of.

Action Verbs for Communication

Action VerbDefinition

AuthorTo be the author of or originate or create a design for.

CollaborateWork jointly with; cooperate with others.

CorrespondCommunicate with.

DraftPrepare in preliminary form.

InformCommunicate knowledge to others.

InquireAsk or search into.

NotifyGive notice or a report on an occurrence or information.

ReportGive notice or a report on an occurrence or information.

WriteTo express or communicate through written words.

Action Verbs for Organization

Action VerbDefinition

AccumulateIncrease gradually in quantity or number.

AdministerManage or direct the execution of affairs.

ArrangeMake preparations for, to plan.

AssembleTo bring together or gather in one place.

CompilePut together information, collect from other documents.

ConsolidateBring together.

CoordinateBring together things or people for a desired result.

OrganizeTo form as or into a whole consisting of interdependent or coordinated parts, especially for united action.

OrderArrange or command to come to a specified place or decision.

PlanTo arrange a method or scheme beforehand for (any work, enterprise, or proceeding).

ScheduleTo appoint, assign, or designate for a fixed time.

PlanTo design or plot a scheme or project by means or method devised for doing something to achieve an end.

Action Verbs for Compliance, Finance, etc.

Action VerbDefinition

AuditTo examine for verification.

CheckTo proof or review for errors.

DeleteEliminate or wipe out.

PreventKeep from happening or holding back.

ReturnGo back in thought or action. Give an official account to a superior.

StopKeep from carrying out a proposed action.

AllocateAssign or apportion for a specific purpose or to a particular person.

ApproveTo consent or agree to or authorize.

AuditTo examine for purposes of verification.

CheckTo proof or review for errors.

ConserveSlow or block the progress of something.

ControlTo exercise influence over; or check, test or verify by evidence.

EditAlter, adapt or refine a written text, concept, or idea.

EnforceTo effect or gain by force. To carry out effectively.

EnsureMake sure, certain, or safe.

GuaranteeUndertake to answer for debt and default or promise security.

InspectExamine materials, equipment, reports, work, etc., to determine quality, suitability for use, etc.

ProtectTo cover or shield from injury or danger.

RegulateFix or adjust the time, amount, degree, or rate.

RestrictPlace under restriction as to use or distribution.

ReviewConsider or examine facts or results for accuracy, completeness and suitability.

VerifyConfirm or substantiate by oath, law, or other documentation.

Action Verbs (Misc.)

Action VerbsDefinition

AdaptModify or change to fit new situations.

ControlExercise restraint or direction over; dominate; command.

CooperateAct jointly with others. Act or work with others to obtain a mutual benefit.

EstablishTo bring into existence.

KeepPreserve or maintain in a good and orderly condition.

MaintainTo keep in an existing state (as of repair, efficiency, or validity) : preserve from failure or decline.

ParticipateTo take part in.

ReviewExamine something for accuracy, completeness and suitability.

ServeComply with the commands and demands of a boss, group.

Action Verbs for Candidate to Take Action on Your Job Description

A job description (or job posting) wouldn’t be complete if you don’t ask the candidate to take action. Here are the top 2 keywords used for the candidate/employee to sign up for the opportunity:

Action VerbDefinition

ApplyTo apply to a job (or to dedicate oneself to something).

JoinTo put or bring together as to form a unit.

Special thanks to these 2 sources:

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