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Word 2010: Styles And Themes

Lesson 18: Styles and Themes

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Introduction

Styles and themes are powerful tools in Word that can help you easily create professional-looking documents. A style is a predefined combination of font style, color, and size of text that can be applied to selected text. A theme is a set of formatting choices that can be applied to an entire document and includes theme colors, fonts, and effects.

In this lesson, you will learn how to apply, modify, and create a style; use style sets; apply a document theme; and create a custom theme.

Using styles and themes

Word’s large selection of styles and themes allows you to quickly improve the appearance of your document. Styles can give your document a more sophisticated look, while themes are a great way to change the tone of your entire document quickly and easily. To use styles and themes effectively, you’ll need to know how to apply, modify, and create a style; use style sets; apply a document theme; and create a custom theme.

Optional: You can download this example for extra practice.

To select a style:

You can also use styles to create a table of contents for your document. To learn how, review our article on How to Create a Table of Contents in Microsoft Word.

To apply a style set:

Style sets include a combination of title, heading, and paragraph styles. Style sets allow you to format all of the elements of your document at once, rather than formatting your title and headings separately.

To modify a style:

To create a new style:

Using themes

A theme is a set of colors, fonts, and effects that determines the overall look of your document. Themes are a great way to change the tone of your entire document quickly and easily.

What is a theme?

All documents in Word 2010 use a theme. You’ve already been using a theme, even if you didn’t know it: the default Office theme. Every theme, including the Office theme, has its own theme elements:

Why should you use theme elements?

Oriel Theme

Tradeshow Theme

Remember, the colors and fonts will only update if you’re using theme fonts or theme colors. If you choose one of the standard colors or any of the fonts that are not theme fonts, your text will not change when you change the theme. This can be useful if you’re creating a logo or title that always needs to look the same.

Selecting a non-theme font

If you’re using built-in styles, you may notice that the fonts for these styles change when you select a different theme. This is because all of the built-in styles are based on the theme fonts. If you don’t want the styles to change, you’ll need to create custom styles.

To change the theme:

Customizing a theme

Let’s say you really like the fonts from one theme, but you want to experiment with different color schemes. Luckily, you can mix and match the colors, fonts, and effects from different themes to create a unique look for your document. If it still doesn’t look exactly right, you can customize the theme colors and theme fonts.

To change theme colors:

When setting theme colors, try to find a part of your document that uses several colors so you get the best idea of what the color scheme looks like.

To change theme fonts:

To change theme effects:

Some themes can add a picture fill to shapes, depending on which shape styles are used. For example, the Paper theme can add a paper-like texture to shapes. Try exploring some of the different shape styles after changing the theme.

To save your theme:

Once you’ve found settings you like, you may want to save the theme so you can use it in other documents.

Challenge!

Open an existing Word document. If you want, you can use this example.

Apply several different styles to different parts of your document.

Apply a style set to your entire document.

Modify an existing style.

Apply a theme.

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How To Create Numbered Headings Or Outline Numbering In Word 2007 And Word 2010

How you set up numbered headings depends on what version of Word you have. This page is about setting up numbered headings in Word 2007 and Word 2010. If you have Word 2003 or an earlier version, see How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in Word 2003 and earlier versions.

Numbering run amok

Word’s paragraph numbering sometimes goes haywire. Just when you think you’ve got it organized, the numbering starts doing silly things. If Word’s paragraph numbering were a group of orchestral musicians, it might look like this:

Musicians run amok

What’s needed?

What’s needed is someone to get those mad horn players organized and co-ordinated [Lene Fredborg 12-Sep-2017: linked picture of orchestra removed – picture doesn’t exist anymore]. We don’t need another player: we clearly have enough of those! What we need is a co-ordinator.

In an orchestra, the conductor co-ordinates. For Word’s numbering, the mechanism we use to organize and co-ordinate paragraph numbering is a List Style. The List Style co-ordinates. It doesn’t do the actual work of formatting text. We leave that to paragraph styles.

So, we need:

a List Style as the co-ordinating mechanism for the numbering, and

a paragraph style for each heading level (Word allows, actually requires, 9 levels).

Understanding List Styles

A List Style has 9 levels. Each level can be linked to a paragraph style. And, each level stores information about how to number text to which that linked paragraph style has been applied.

A List Style actually does two things.

A List Style creates a set or group of styles. Word comes with built-in paragraph styles named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3. But there is no connection between them. They just happen to share similar names. A List Style ‘groups’ those paragraph styles into some order. Only the List Style knows that Heading 1 is followed by Heading 2 and that it is followed by Heading 3. There are 9 levels in any List Style.

A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( “1” or “a” or “i”), whether the number is preceded by text (eg “Chapter 1” or “Part A”), whether the number includes previous levels’ numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).

Set up your Heading paragraph styles

There are good reasons for using the built-in Heading styles.

Before you begin the numbering, make sure your Heading styles are set up appropriately.

Modify the Heading 1 style so that it is based on “No style”. Modify Heading 2 so it’s based on Heading 1. Modify Heading 3 based on Heading 2. And so on. Not everyone does this, but I find it useful because of the way the formatting of Word’s styles cascade.

Now, modify the Paragraph settings of every Heading style so that the Left Indent is 0, and the Special indent is set to (none). Do this even if you want your headings to be indented from the left margin, and even if you want a hanging indent. Why? Because for outline-numbered styles, we will set the paragraph indent and the hanging indents (if any) when we set up the numbering.

Create a list style

Figure 1: Choose the Multilevel list menu

From the menu, choose Define New List Style (Figure 2).

Figure 2: On the Multilevel list menu, choose the Define New List Style option.

In the Define New List Style dialog (Figure 3), do (only) two things:

Give your list style a name. Hint: Give it aplural name. That makes it clear that this is a list style that’s controlling more than one paragraph style. And, give it a name directly related to the paragraph styles you’re going to use. We’re going to use paragraph styles Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3 etc. So I suggest that you name the list style as Headings.

We’re now in the Modify Multilevel List dialog box (Figure 5). The list style is the co-ordinating mechanism for the whole “set” of paragraph styles we’ll use. So we set up all levels of numbering in this one dialog box.

To set up the numbering:

Attach the Heading paragraph styles to the 9 levels in the list style. To do that:

Now we tell Word about the numbering itself for Level 1

Delete anything in the ‘Enter formatting for number” box.

If you want the numbering to start with some text (eg to number a paragraph as “Chapter 1” or “Section 1”) then enter the text including any space in the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box. Leave the insertion point after your text.

From the Number style for this level list, choose the kind of numbering you want.

Set up numbering for levels 2 to 9.

Delete anything in the ‘Enter formatting for number” box.

If you want to include a previous level’s numbering, then use the ‘Include level number from’ box. If you want punctuation after each level, add it into the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box as you go.

For example, for Level 2, I might want the numbering to be “1.1”. That is, I want the Level 1 number and the Level 2 number. So, from the ‘Include level number from’ box, I choose ‘Level 1’. Then I type a full stop (full point, period, whatever). Then I choose from the ‘Number style for this level’ box.

You have to do each previous level separately. By the time you come to do Level 9, if you want paragraphs numbered 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1, you need to add Level 1, Level 2, Level 3 etc, all the way to Level 8. This can get tedious, but hang in there!

From the Number style for this level list, choose the kind of numbering you want for the current level.

Repeat for each of levels 3 to 9. If you don’t want numbering for a level, leave the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box empty.

The hard way is to set the ‘Aligned at’, ‘Text indent at’ and ‘Add tab stop at’ boxes individually. Just remember that they’re all measured from the left margin.

My finished settings look like Figure 5.

Figure 5: The finished settings in the Modify Multilevel List dialog

OK, OK back to your document.

How to apply the Heading styles to your text

So you have set up your List Style. But we don’t ever use the List Style. Instead, we format paragraphs using the Heading 1, Heading 2 etc paragraph styles. Because you linked the heading paragraph styles to the List Style, the heading styles will now use the numbering you set up in the List Style.

Applying numbering

The conductor doesn’t produce any sound: musicians do that. And you won’t find a part for the conductor in the score.

The list style doesn’t format your text: paragraph styles do that. And you won’t find the list style in the Styles pane.

Apply your paragraph styles to text. We don’t ever actually use the list style.

How to apply Heading 1 style to a paragraph

To apply the numbering to one or more paragraphs in your document:

How to create a lower-level heading (or: how to demote a heading)

Figure 6: Use the Increase Indent button to demote a paragraph (ie indent it to the right)

You can create lower levels of headings by applying the paragraph styles Heading 2, Heading 3 etc. There are lots of ways to apply a paragraph style to your text. Here are three particularly relevant to headings:

How to edit your numbering scheme

Your numbering scheme is stored in your Headings list style. It’s not stored in the individual paragraph styles. Therefore:

Edit the individual paragraph styles if you want to change paragraph settings (eg space before or after) or the font of the text that follows the heading text (eg to make it big or pink or bold). To edit an individual paragraph style, see How to modify styles in Microsoft Word.

Edit the list style if you want to change the numbers, the position between number and text, the size of the number itself and so on. To edit your list style:

Figure 7: Choose the Multilevel list menu

You will see the Headings list style highlighted at the bottom of the menu.

Is all this really necessary? Can’t I just use the List Library?

If using the List Library on the Multilevel List menu (see Figure 2 or Figure 8 ) works for you, then go for it! For quick’n’dirty work, it may be just the thing.

For a corporate template that will be used by hundreds or thousands of users, it’s probably not the best solution. For really big complicated documents, or documents where you have to cut and paste from one document to another a lot, then the List Library may let you down.

For more information, directly from Microsoft’s Word development team, see [NOTE: outdated links removed by Lene Fredborg 29-Dec-2016] The Many Levels of Lists and Multilevel Lists vs List Styles.

Too good to be true?

Related articles on other sites

And, read from people in Microsoft’s Word development team especially Stuart Stuple’s The Why Behind Our Styles and Lists Designs.

Related articles on this site

How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in your Microsoft Word document. How to number headings and figures in Appendixes in Microsoft Word

Photo info

Photograph of horn players taken at National Music Camp, Geelong Grammar, January 1993. I have no recollection of why all the horn players were wearing silly hats, but National Music Camp has a fine tradition of encouraging innocent pranks and general merriment-as well as damned hard work-so it’s not entirely surprising. What’s more puzzing is why I kept the photo all these years!

John Curro, conductor of the Queensland Youth Orchestra who taught me more than I’ll ever know.

Understanding Styles In Microsoft Word

I have three character styles in most of my pleading documents. Two replace Bold and Italic formatting. The third is for citations. The first two are built-in character styles of “Strong” and “Emphasis.” I started using these before Word had a replace formatting feature. I’m not sure they are needed. They provide a simple way of changing how I emphasize something throughout a document by simply changing the style. It starts out that “Strong” is bold and “Emphasis” is Italicized.

The third, though, has proved its worth through time. It is the Citation character style. I set it to Italic and set the language formatting to “no proofing.” This means that case citations with it will not alert the spell checker. (Of course, this also means you better have the correct spelling.) It also disables automatic hyphenation. To set this up, you would create a new character style and use the formatting drop-down to add the Italic and “no-proofing” formatting. The Italic formatting comes through the font formatting dialog, and the “no-proofing” comes through the language dialog. In later versions of Word “no-proofing” is known as “Do not check spelling or grammar.”

Character styles can also be used as targets for the StyleRef field. This field gives very quick automatic updating. A mark text that may be edited. I will often use character styles that apply to only one word or phrase in a document that I want to repeat StyleRef Field is used instead of a Ref field to repeat it elsewhere.

The built in heading styles in Word have special properties that make them almost magical. There are keyboard shortcuts for the top three. They can appear without any customization in a Table of Contents generated by Word, you can link and navigate to them with cross-referencing features, and more. See Why use Microsoft Word’s built-in heading styles? by Shauna Kelly, MVP, for sixteen reasons to use these styles. In Word 2007 and later, the Heading Styles are Linked Styles by default.

The primary reason to do this is when you want a snippet from the beginning of a particular heading to appear in a Table of Contents but don’t want the entire heading in the Table of Contents.

The screenshot above, with non-printing formatting marks displayed, shows two different paragraph styles used in one logical printed paragraph. Note the pillcrow (paragraph mark) with the dots around it separating the two. The colors of the styles here are different. The usual use of this, though, would be for the styles to look the same. This was used in automatically generating the Table of Contents. The second part of the paragraph, in the non-heading style did not get picked up in the Table of Contents.

You would not want to base the second style on the heading style though, because then it would also be a heading style. This is, instead, based on the Body Text style and formatted using the same font and size as the Heading 1 Style.

You can add a Style Separator to the end of a paragraph using the Ctrl+Alt+Enter Keyboard Shortcut. Then you add your text for the separate style.

Here is another screenshot:

If you delete a Style Separator, the entire paragraph will take on the formatting of the text preceding the Separator. See this thread on the Microsoft Answers forum for more.

As of this writing (March, 2017), the Style Separator does not exist on the Macintosh versions of Word. You can create your own by simply pressing Enter at the end of the first part of your text (style 1) and creating your following text in Style 2 in the new paragraph. Then go back and select the paragraph mark at the end of the first paragraph and mark it as Hidden text (Cmd+Shift+H). This method works on Windows versions as well (Ctrl+Shift+H).

See also Creating

When you add a style separator, the insertion point and the style separator will both be at the end of the Word paragraph. If you have a paragraph already written and you wish to separate part of it out, place your insertion point where you want the separation to occur. Instead of pressing Ctrl+Alt+Enter, simply press the Enter key. This creates a new Word paragraph.

Format that new paragraph using a style that will not be picked up in the Table of Contents. Then go to the paragraph that you want to show up in the Table of Contents and press Ctrl+Alt+Enter.

This will rejoin the two paragraphs, with a Style Separator between them.

Note: Style Separators and Automatically Numbered paragraphs. Only the first should be numbered.

You should not use the Style Separator to try to combine two automatically numbered paragraphs. If you do, the numbering will disappear in the text but may still appear as a separate line in the Table of Contents! The numbering will still count, and the next paragraph will act like it is there but the reader will not see it.

The paragraph with the additional text should not be in a style that is designated to appear in a Table of Contents. For examinations  of these problems, look at this Stack Overflow question and my answer here: Delete Blank Space When Using Macro to Insert Style Separator.

If numbering is needed for the joined paragraph, I recommend using SEQ Field numbering insteand of list numbering. Numbering in Microsoft Word. That way, the numbers will appear in the text. That joined paragraph should not be in a style that appears in the Table of Contents.

Change Table Style In Word

By default, a table is created with the Table Grid style, which includes a basic black border around each cell in the table. Word includes many built-in styles that provide more visual appeal.

The Table Styles group will show a few table styles, but to see the rest, you’ll need to expand the gallery.

Select a style.

The style is applied to the table, changing the borders, shading, and colors.

You could create a new style by selecting New Table Style or modify an existing one by selecting Modify Table Style and choosing which formatting you’d like.

To remove a Table Style, select Clear from the More Table Styles menu.

You can further customize a table style by changing the table style options.

Use the check boxes in the Table Style Options group to toggle the following settings:

Header Row will apply special formatting to the first row of the table. This special formatting can include font effects, or font, background, and border color.

First Column will apply special formatting to the first column.

Total Row will add special formatting to the final row of a table, designed to summarize the rows above it.

Last Column will apply special formatting to the last column to summarize the earlier columns.

Banded Rows will alternate the background color of rows.

Banded Columns will alternate the background color of columns.

You can control how text is aligned within a table cell, just like you’d align text on the page.

Select the cell or cells you want to align.

You could also select the entire table if you want to align all the text together.

Expand the Alignment group, if necessary.

There are nine alignment options, letting you align the content to either side of a cell, any corner, or center it in the middle of the cell.

Select an alignment option.

The text in the selected cell realigns to the selected side or corner.

You can also select Text Direction to change the text from left-to-right to top-to-bottom or bottom-to-top.

You can also adjust the margins between cell borders and the text within those cells.

Select cell or cells you want to adjust.

You can select the entire table to adjust all the margins at once.

From the Layout tab, expand the Alignment group, if necessary.

In the Table Options dialog box, we can adjust the margins for the selected cell or cells. The margin affects how much space there is between the edge of the cell and the contents of that cell.

Adjust the margins.

You can adjust the margin on each side of the cell independently.

The cell margins are changed.