Đề Xuất 1/2023 # Transitions – The Writing Center • University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill # Top 4 Like | Beiqthatgioi.com

Đề Xuất 1/2023 # Transitions – The Writing Center • University Of North Carolina At Chapel Hill # Top 4 Like

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Transitions

What this handout is about

In this crazy, mixed-up world of ours, transitions glue our ideas and our essays together. This handout will introduce you to some useful transitional expressions and help you employ them effectively.

The function and importance of transitions

In both academic writing and professional writing, your goal is to convey information clearly and concisely, if not to convert the reader to your way of thinking. Transitions help you to achieve these goals by establishing logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers. In other words, transitions tell readers what to do with the information you present to them. Whether single words, quick phrases, or full sentences, they function as signs that tell readers how to think about, organize, and react to old and new ideas as they read through what you have written.

Transitions signal relationships between ideas—relationships such as: “Another example coming up—stay alert!” or “Here’s an exception to my previous statement” or “Although this idea appears to be true, here’s the real story.” Basically, transitions provide the reader with directions for how to piece together your ideas into a logically coherent argument. Transitions are not just verbal decorations that embellish your paper by making it sound or read better. They are words with particular meanings that tell the reader to think and react in a particular way to your ideas. In providing the reader with these important cues, transitions help readers understand the logic of how your ideas fit together.

Signs that you might need to work on your transitions

How can you tell whether you need to work on your transitions? Here are some possible clues:

Your readers (instructors, friends, or classmates) tell you that they had trouble following your organization or train of thought.

You tend to write the way you think—and your brain often jumps from one idea to another pretty quickly.

You wrote your paper in several discrete “chunks” and then pasted them together.

You are working on a group paper; the draft you are working on was created by pasting pieces of several people’s writing together.

Organization

Since the clarity and effectiveness of your transitions will depend greatly on how well you have organized your paper, you may want to evaluate your paper’s organization before you work on transitions. In the margins of your draft, summarize in a word or short phrase what each paragraph is about or how it fits into your analysis as a whole. This exercise should help you to see the order of and connection between your ideas more clearly.

If after doing this exercise you find that you still have difficulty linking your ideas together in a coherent fashion, your problem may not be with transitions but with organization. For help in this area (and a more thorough explanation of the “reverse outlining” technique described in the previous paragraph), please see the Writing Center’s handout on organization.

How transitions work

The organization of your written work includes two elements: (1) the order in which you have chosen to present the different parts of your discussion or argument, and (2) the relationships you construct between these parts. Transitions cannot substitute for good organization, but they can make your organization clearer and easier to follow. Take a look at the following example:

El Pais, a Latin American country, has a new democratic government after having been a dictatorship for many years. Assume that you want to argue that El Pais is not as democratic as the conventional view would have us believe.

One way to effectively organize your argument would be to present the conventional view and then to provide the reader with your critical response to this view. So, in Paragraph A you would enumerate all the reasons that someone might consider El Pais highly democratic, while in Paragraph B you would refute these points. The transition that would establish the logical connection between these two key elements of your argument would indicate to the reader that the information in paragraph B contradicts the information in paragraph A. As a result, you might organize your argument, including the transition that links paragraph A with paragraph B, in the following manner:

Paragraph A: points that support the view that El Pais’s new government is very democratic.

Transition: Despite the previous arguments, there are many reasons to think that El Pais’s new government is not as democratic as typically believed.

Paragraph B: points that contradict the view that El Pais’s new government is very democratic.

In this case, the transition words “Despite the previous arguments,” suggest that the reader should not believe paragraph A and instead should consider the writer’s reasons for viewing El Pais’s democracy as suspect.

As the example suggests, transitions can help reinforce the underlying logic of your paper’s organization by providing the reader with essential information regarding the relationship between your ideas. In this way, transitions act as the glue that binds the components of your argument or discussion into a unified, coherent, and persuasive whole.

Types of transitions

Now that you have a general idea of how to go about developing effective transitions in your writing, let us briefly discuss the types of transitions your writing will use.

The types of transitions available to you are as diverse as the circumstances in which you need to use them. A transition can be a single word, a phrase, a sentence, or an entire paragraph. In each case, it functions the same way: First, the transition either directly summarizes the content of a preceding sentence, paragraph, or section or implies such a summary (by reminding the reader of what has come before). Then, it helps the reader anticipate or comprehend the new information that you wish to present.

Transitions between sections: Particularly in longer works, it may be necessary to include transitional paragraphs that summarize for the reader the information just covered and specify the relevance of this information to the discussion in the following section.

Transitions within paragraphs: As with transitions between sections and paragraphs, transitions within paragraphs act as cues by helping readers to anticipate what is coming before they read it. Within paragraphs, transitions tend to be single words or short phrases.

Transitional expressions

Effectively constructing each transition often depends upon your ability to identify words or phrases that will indicate for the reader the kind of logical relationships you want to convey. The table below should make it easier for you to find these words or phrases. Whenever you have trouble finding a word, phrase, or sentence to serve as an effective transition, refer to the information in the table for assistance. Look in the left column of the table for the kind of logical relationship you are trying to express. Then look in the right column of the table for examples of words or phrases that express this logical relationship.

Keep in mind that each of these words or phrases may have a slightly different meaning. Consult a dictionary or writer’s handbook if you are unsure of the exact meaning of a word or phrase.

LOGICAL RELATIONSHIP TRANSITIONAL EXPRESSION

Similarity also, in the same way, just as … so too, likewise, similarly

Exception/Contrast but, however, in spite of, on the one hand … on the other hand, nevertheless, nonetheless, notwithstanding, in contrast, on the contrary, still, yet

Sequence/Order first, second, third, … next, then, finally

Time after, afterward, at last, before, currently, during, earlier, immediately, later, meanwhile, now, recently, simultaneously, subsequently, then

Example for example, for instance, namely, specifically, to illustrate

Emphasis even, indeed, in fact, of course, truly

Place/Position above, adjacent, below, beyond, here, in front, in back, nearby, there

Cause and Effect accordingly, consequently, hence, so, therefore, thus

Additional Support or Evidence additionally, again, also, and, as well, besides, equally important, further, furthermore, in addition, moreover, then

Conclusion/Summary finally, in a word, in brief, briefly, in conclusion, in the end, in the final analysis, on the whole, thus, to conclude, to summarize, in sum, to sum up, in summary

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License. You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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6 Universal Rules For Resume Writing (With Video)

For busy hiring managers, your resume provides a snapshot of your career and is often the determining factor in whether you land an interview. If a job search is a journey, a stellar resume is your passport.

The fundamental principles of resume writing have remained constant for generations, but evolving technologies mean more aspects of the application and hiring processes take place online than ever before. By staying up to date with current best practices, you’re better able to put your resume to work for you. In this article, we discuss these six universal rules to keep in mind as you create or update your resume:

Cover all the basics

Explore other resumes for inspiration

Use as few words as possible

Quantify your accomplishments whenever possible

Use keywords that employers are using in their job descriptions

Proofread several times to catch typos and misspellings

How to write a resume

Note that you can apply these rules to any resume format, but because of how various software read your resume, a simple, one-column format with a professional font may serve you best.

Image description

Resume Format1. Name and contact information2. Summary or objective3. Professional historya. Company nameb. Dates of tenurec. Description of role and achievement4. Education5. Skills6. Optional (Awards & Achievements, Hobbies & Interests)

1. Cover all the basics

The goal of a resume is to best represent your relevant skills and accomplishments, and there are several ways to do that successfully. That said, every resume requires these basic elements:

Relevant educational degrees or certifications and/or licenses. The importance of your educational background will vary based on the job or industry you’re interested in. If you have many educational credentials, you only need to include the ones that are most relevant to the job description.

Relevant work and volunteer experience. Most people choose to list their experience starting with their most recent job. Don’t include everything you did in your past jobs. Instead, focus on achievements over responsibilities.

Contact information. Your full name, the city where you live, your email address and phone number. Because this personal information is sensitive, you should be cautious about who you share your resume with. Read over these guidelines for a safe job search to protect yourself.

Relevant skills and your level of mastery. For example, “conversational Spanish” or “familiar with Microsoft Excel” vs. “fluent in Spanish” or “expert at Microsoft Excel”.

It’s important to note that the basics of a resume often do not include references. It’s a best practice to leave these off your resume. This helps you save space and also preserves the privacy of your professional contacts.

Related: 10 Best Skills to Include on a Resume (With Examples)

2. Explore other resumes for inspiration

It can be useful to see how other people have written about their skills and experiences. We have hundreds of resume samples for you to explore. Choose the job category and title that’s relevant to you and see samples from people with different amounts of experience. This is a great way to uncover stronger ways to describe your credentials and to avoid overused words.

You can also get a sense of the internal language used within a particular industry or company. You might have experience that isn’t directly related but is still highly relevant to the position you’re applying for, and you want to include it in your resume. Someone else’s resume might feature a similar history and offer an example of how to frame this experience in a compelling way.

Related: Functional Resume Tips and Examples

3. Use as few words as possible

Employers need to quickly understand your work experience. Format your experience as a list of short, scannable statements, rather than writing out dense paragraphs. For example:

Too wordy: Applied expert budget management skills to achieve a 20% reduction in departmental expenses through diligent research, identifying significant inefficiencies.

More concise: Achieved 20% departmental cost savings by eliminating inefficiencies.

The typical resume is two pages maximum, so make sure all the information you’ve included is essential. If you can’t decide what is essential, ask yourself if what you’re including is relevant to what the employer is asking for in the job description.

It’s also important to consider the kind of work you truly want to be hired to do. In other words, don’t include past experience for tasks you strongly dislike doing. Keep the experiences that you want to keep building on and match what the employer is looking for-this meets the definition of essential information to include on your resume.

Related: Words to Avoid and Include on a Resume

4. Quantify your accomplishments whenever possible

Numbers and data bring your work experience to life and help hiring managers envision the potential impact you could have in their organization. When you can, back up your achievements with real data to boost your credibility and add informative detail to your resume. For example:

Unquantified: Improved lead generation through strategic content marketing initiatives.

Quantified: Achieved 180% year-over-year lead growth through strategic content marketing initiatives.

Read more: 139 Actions Verbs to Make Your Resume Stand Out

5. Use keywords that employers are using in their job descriptions

One way to become familiar with the different keywords is to experiment with different search terms on chúng tôi or on the Indeed app. Carefully read the job postings that interest you, and take note of the terms and phrases that employers are including there. You may begin to notice commonalities and can include some of these words or concepts in your resume if they are applicable to your background.

Related: Listing Professional Experience on Your Resume

6. Proofread several times to catch typos and misspellings

Unfortunately, a single typographical or spelling error is sometimes enough to get your resume discarded early in the game. Proofread your resume multiple times, doing a thorough line-by-line, word-by-word edit. Reading content backward-awkward and time-consuming though it may be-is a great way to catch minor mistakes that you might otherwise miss. Getting an outside perspective is always a good idea. Ask a friend, mentor, or family member to review your resume for you before you begin submitting it to employers.

A strong resume can streamline your job search process, helping you showcase your strengths and get one step closer to your dream job. With some diligent work upfront-and by adhering to these six rules-you can turn this fundamental job search document into one of your strongest professional assets.

Apply these learnings and build your Indeed Resume.

100 Good Transition Words For Essays By Experts

100 Best Transition Words for Essays

Essay writing is a technical process that requires much more effort than simply pouring your thoughts on paper.

What the writer is trying to convey and how they do it plays a significant role in this process. Also, your essays are assessed according to a particular criteria and it is your responsibility to ensure that it is being met.

Along with other aspects, you need to make sure that the paper is coherent and maintains a logical flow. This can successfully be achieved with the help of transition words for essays.

If you are new to the concept of transition words and phrases, deep dive into this article in order to find out the secret for improving your essays.

What are Transition Words?

As writers, our goal is to communicate our thoughts and ideas in the most clear and logical manner. Especially when presenting complex ideas, we must ensure that they are being conveyed in the most understandable way.

To ensure that your paper is easy to understand, you can work on the sequencing of ideas. Break down your ideas into different paragraphs then use a transition word or phrase to guide them through these ideas.

Think of a transition as a conjunction or a joining word. It helps create strong relationships between ideas, paragraphs, or sentences.

They form a bridge to connect different ideas making sure that there’s a smooth writing flow. In addition to tying the entire paper together, they help demonstrate the writer’s agreement, disagreement, conclusion, or contrast.

However, you must keep in mind that just using transition words isn’t enough to highlight relationships between ideas. The content of your paragraphs must support the relationship as well.

List of Transition Words

As mentioned above, there are different categories of transitions that serve a unique purpose. Understanding these different types will help you pick the most suitable word or phrase to communicate your message.

Here we have categorized transition words for different types of essays and relationships for your assistance – use them appropriately!

Transition Words for Argumentative Essays

To begin with

To show

By contrast

One alternative is

Chiefly

Mainly

To put more simply

At the same time

On the contrary

Even if ‘A’ is true

Afterall

With this in mind

All things considered

As a result

To clarify

Generally speaking

Another way to view this

That is to say

Yet another

Another possibility is

Despite

In contrast

Nevertheless

On the contrary

On the other hand

Otherwise

As an illustration

That is

Conversely

In spite of

Similarly

At the same time

Likewise

Still

In a similar fashion

Equally

Also

Yet

But

Simultaneously

Transition Words for Cause and Effect Essays

As a result

Under those circumstances

Thus

In effect

For this reason

Thereupon

Henceforth

Accordingly

Consequently

Because

Since

Otherwise

Due to

So

As a

Hence

In order to

If…then

For

Afterwards

Transition Words to Start a Paragraph

Generally speaking

In the first place

To begin with

To be sure

Assuredly

Earlier

First of all

The next step

As you can see

For now

In time

Once and for all

First… second… third…

To put it differently

Foundationally

In addition

Basically

Furthermore

Besides

In the meantime

Transition Words for Conclusions

All things considered

Given these points

In summary

To summarize

In short

Briefly

After all

That is to say

Finally

All in all

In the final analysis

As previously stated

In essence

Ultimately

To sum up

On the whole

By and large

Overall

Everything considered

Taking everything into account

Do

Don’t

Add transitions only where introducing new ideas.

Don’t overuse them.

Go through the paper to make sure they make sense.

Don’t keep adding transitions in the same paragraph.

Start by creating an outline, so you know what ideas to share and how.

Don’t completely rely on transitions to signal relationships.

Use different transitions for each idea.

Don’t incorporate it in your content without understanding its usage.

You have probably understood how transition words can save you from disjointed and directionless paragraphs. They are the missing piece that indicate how ideas are related to one another.

If you are still unable to distinguish transitions to open or conclude your essays, don’t be upset – these things require time and practice.

If you have an important paper due now, you can get in touch with the expert writers at 5StarEssays. They will incorporate the right transitions according to the type of paper, ensuring a coherent flow of ideas.

Place your order today and get quality content in the most pocket-friendly rates available.

How To Write A Persuasive Argument

Persuasive writing is tough for kids to get used to, especially if they’re not argumentative by nature. A few tools and shortcuts can help your child learn how to write well enough to convince someone (even you!) to change his mind about an issue that really matters to him or her.

Persuasive Strategies and Devices

There are common persuasion techniques sometimes referred to as persuasive devices that can be used to back up an argument in writing. Knowing the names of the strategies and how they work can make it easier to remember them when it’s time to write. The five common persuasive strategies are:

Pathos: Pathos involves using emotional language that is designed to draw the reader in and make them feel for you. For example: “If my allowance isn’t increased, I won’t be able to go out with my friends and do everything they do.”

Big Names: The big names strategy involves using the names of experts or well-known people who support your position. For example: “Dad agrees that increasing my allowance will…”

Research and Logos: These strategies involve using studies, data, charts, illustrations, and logic to back up her position and points. For example: “As you can see in the pie chart, at my age the average child’s allowance is…”

Ethos: The ethos strategy of persuasion involves using language that shows that the writer is trustworthy and believable. For example: “As you may recall, I’ve always been willing to put ten percent of my allowance in my bank account, thus…”

Kairos: This type of argument creates a sense of urgency about how this is the right moment to act. For example: “If I don’t get an increase in my allowance today, I will miss out on the chance to…”

Phrases and Words to Use in Persuasive Writing

Once your child has figured out the techniques she can use in her persuasive writing, she will need to find some words and phrases that help her to be convincing. Using phrases like “I think” or “It seems that” don’t convey a sense of confidence in her position. Instead, she needs to use word combinations that show how much she believes in what she is writing.

Phrases to Illustrate a Point: For instance, for example, specifically, in particular, namely, such as, like

Phrases to Introduce an Example: For example, thus, as an example, in the instance of, in other words, to illustrate

Phrases to Make Suggestions: To this end, keeping this in mind, for this purpose, therefore

Phrases to Transition Between Information: Also, furthermore, additionally, besides that, equally as important, similarly, likewise, as a result, otherwise, however

Phrases to Contrast Points: On the other hand, nevertheless, despite, in spite of, yet, conversely, instead, by the same token

Phrases for Conclusions and Summarizing: With this in mind, as a result of, because of this, for this reason, so, due to, since, finally, in short, in conclusion

Other Handy Phrases for Persuasive Writing

Some phrases don’t easily fit into a category and are just good for general use in persuasive writing. Here are a few to remember:

I am certain. . .

I’m sure that you can see that . . .

What needs to be done/what we need to do. . .

I ask you to think about . . .

I am writing in order to . . .

Nevertheless . . .

On the other hand . . .

It has come to my attention that . . .

If you move forward with . . .

Obviously. . .

Surely . . .

Regardless . . .

If [ ] were to happen, then . . .

This can be fixed by . . .

Although it may seem…

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